Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

DEBATE

Europe's Plan for Putin - Will Russian Leader Bend After New Sanctions? (part 2)

Read more

DEBATE

Europe's Plan for Putin - Will Russian Leader Bend After New Sanctions?

Read more

FOCUS

Pakistan's Ahmadis living in fear of extremist attacks

Read more

WEB NEWS

Web users show solidarity with Iraqi Christians

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Gilles Kepel, Islamic and Arab world specialist

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Argentina braced for another debt default

Read more

DEBATE

Too Late for Sanctions? Pressure Mounts on Russia over Ukraine (part 2)

Read more

DEBATE

Too Late for Sanctions? Pressure Mounts on Russia over Ukraine

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

'What would you do?'

Read more

  • US and EU slap Russia with fresh sanctions over Ukraine

    Read more

  • Scores killed as Israel ramps up Gaza bombardment

    Read more

  • Graphic: Ebola spreads across West Africa

    Read more

  • In pictures: ن - a sign of support for Iraq’s persecuted Christians

    Read more

  • Calls mount to ban France’s ‘violent’ Jewish Defence League

    Read more

  • Venezuela: Hugo Chavez’s ‘little bird’ strikes again

    Read more

  • France extradites suspected Jewish Museum shooter to Belgium

    Read more

  • Video: How tourism is helping Rwanda’s gorillas, ex-poachers

    Read more

  • Rare Sri Lankan leopard cubs born in French zoo

    Read more

  • France evacuates its nationals from Libya

    Read more

  • US says Russia violated arms treaty by testing cruise missile

    Read more

  • Argentina in last-ditch effort to avert default

    Read more

  • Karzai’s cousin killed in Afghan suicide attack

    Read more

  • Libya oil tanker fire blazes out of control

    Read more

  • In pictures: From Gaza to Mosul, bittersweet end of Ramadan for Muslims

    Read more

  • Moroccan police arrest French al Qaeda recruiter

    Read more

Europe

Thousands of Russian nationalists rally in Moscow

© Photo: AFP

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2013-11-04

Thousands of Russian nationalists protested in Moscow Monday against migrants they accuse of taking jobs and causing crime. The rally took place on Unity Day, a national holiday that has been adopted by ultranationalists since its creation in 2005.

Several thousand Russian nationalists rallied Monday in Moscow, venting against the migrants they accuse of pushing up the crime rate and taking their jobs.

The protest took place on Unity Day, a national holiday established in 2005 to replace commemorations of the Bolshevik Revolution.

Many demonstrators carried Russian imperial flags. One group displayed a banner reading “Young People Against Tolerance.”

Animosity is strong among nationalists against migrants from the former Soviet Central Asian republics and against non-Slavs from the largely Muslim Russian Caucasus region. Central Asian migrants are widely employed in big cities in construction and do other low-paid jobs that Russians are not eager to do.

The protesters, from tough-looking youths and neo-Nazis to older people, marched in a quiet southeast neighborhood Monday afternoon along a tree-lined boulevard.

The crowd has grown more middle-class since 2005 when the first march was held. A string of well-publicized crimes committed by migrants has embittered many Muscovites who see police as unwilling to persecute the perpetrators.

Authorities have largely ignored the flow of Central Asians migrants, neither trying to integrate the newcomers or cut on the immigration.

While some of the onlookers were displeased, other locals said they were supporting the march.

Yelena Yermakova, a 56-year-old who was taking a walk with her daughter and two grandchildren, said there are “too many” migrants in Moscow and they are “getting cheeky.”

Monday’s rally came three weeks after rioters targeted a vegetable warehouse where they believed the alleged migrant killer of an ethnic Russian man was working. Police later rounded up more than 1,000 migrants working at the warehouse.

Some demonstrators praised the riot and suggested it was backed by the state.

“People received a signal that if they engage in such pogroms, there will be progress,” said Yevgeny Morgunov, a 37-year-old researcher at the Russian National Academy of Sciences.

He said he didn’t support the radical exclusionary sentiment reflected in the nationalist slogan “Russia for Russians,” but said “if Russians feel good, the other people of Russia will feel it too.”

Morgunov said he and others would not be going to protests where neo-Nazis were marching if at least some nationalist forces were represented in Parliament.

Russia has recently liberalized the entry of parties into politics, registering dozens of obscure political groups. But even mildly nationalist forces were not allowed.

About 30 people were detained at the rally for using Nazi slogans and symbols as well as for other misdemeanors, Moscow police said.

Nationalist rallies were held in other Russian cities as well, including St. Petersburg, Kazan and Irkutsk.

A U.N. report in September said Russia has about 11 million migrants. Russia is visa-free for all Central Asian republics, so most of the migrant workers are in Russia legally.

(AP)

Date created : 2013-11-04

  • RUSSIA

    Thousands march against Putin crackdown in Moscow

    Read more

  • RUSSIA

    Anti-immigrant mob riots after Moscow murder

    Read more

  • RUSSIA

    Migrant workers killed in Moscow market fire

    Read more

COMMENT(S)