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We travel across the globe and meet the people behind the most fascinating environmental, health and technological innovations in a bid for sustainable solutions to our changing world. Every other Sunday at 8.40 pm.

DOWN TO EARTH

DOWN TO EARTH

Latest update : 2014-01-29

Green jobs for jailbirds

In the United States, hundreds of inmates are finding redemption in conservation. We meet some of these prisoners who are embracing a project that brings science and nature inside their prison walls.

Green grease

Manny was robbing banks before he became a fish farmer at Stafford Creek Corrections Center. Toby propagates native plants while serving 23 years for serious sex offences. And Christopher used to prefer causing trouble on the streets to growing organic vegetables for fellow prisoners.

Today, the trio are among hundreds of inmates within Washington state's penal system who have embraced a project that brings science and nature inside the prison, with an impact that goes well beyond the four barbed wire walls.

The initiative, known as the Sustainability in Prisons project, started back in 2004. It's since been copied by nine other American states, with constant interest from around the globe.

By Mairead DUNDAS , Marie SCHUSTER , Marina BERTSCH , Juliette LACHARNAY

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Archives

2014-09-21 environment

Global warming: A drowning planet

Rising sea levels are an inevitable consequence of global warming. Scientific research indicates that sea levels worldwide have been rising at a rate of 0.14 inches (3.5...

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2014-06-22 water

Microplastics: The planet's tiny threat

Tiny plastic particles, barely visible, are infecting the world's sea and oceans, where they're being eaten by fish and other aquatic species before making their way up the food...

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2014-06-09 technology

Biomimicry: Hacking nature

Biomimicry is the science of mimicking life. Have millions of years of evolution churned out all the answers?

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2014-05-25 technology

Japan: Robots that care

This week, Down to Earth explores Japan's efforts to embrace robots to fill the gap left by a growing shortage of manpower.It's no secret that Japan is facing a demographic...

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2014-05-11 Sustainable development

Japan: Fukushima fallout

It's more than three years since an earthquake and tsunami crippled Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant and authorities are still battling to contain the fallout.

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