Don't miss




Nigeria's President Buhari meets with released Dapchi girls

Read more


Southern France attack; Sarkozy and Gaddafi; The return of John Bolton

Read more

#TECH 24

Tech meets healthcare: gadgets for chronic diseases

Read more

#THE 51%

The rise of artificial intelligence: How will it impact women’s jobs

Read more


Brexit: Britain divided

Read more


Was the French national strike a success?

Read more


Discovering France's Mediterranean shipwrecks

Read more


Menswear, spring 2018: Men are changing, for good!

Read more


German villages sacrificed in the name of coal

Read more


We return to places which have been in the news - often a long time ago, sometimes recently - to see how local people are rebuilding their lives. Sunday at 9.10 pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2014-02-12

Video: The rebirth of Colombia’s Medellin

Drug trafficking, gang warfare, murder and state-sponsored crime... In Medellin, it’s hard not to find a family affected by murder or kidnapping. Over 30 years, the violence saw 80,000 people lose their lives. But today, Medellin is trying to shake off its bad reputation, put on a new face and even attract tourists.

Just over twenty years ago, on December 2nd, 1993, Colombian police shot dead one of the most wanted fugitives in the world on a rooftop in Medellin. His name: Pablo Escobar. Back then, the notorious drug trafficker was involved in a merciless war against the Colombian state. Medellin, his home town, his refuge, was known as one of the most dangerous cities in the world. The working-class neighbourhoods were Escobar’s recruiting ground. Young people without hope of a better future gave in to the temptation of easy money and became assassins for the "narcos”, in return for a few pesos.

Medellin’s homicide rates long remained among the highest in the world. The city seemed trapped in a vicious circle of endless violence.

But twenty years after the death of Escobar, Medellin, nicknamed "the city of eternal spring” in Colombia, is finally rising from the ashes of its difficult past. In 2013 it beat New York and Tel Aviv to win the prize for the world’s most innovative city, awarded by the Wall Street Journal. A distinction earned in part thanks to a particularly efficient public transport system, with its metros and cable cars that connect the barrios (the working-class neighbourhoods) to the centre. But the prize is also no doubt due to excellent town planning and a thriving local economy.

A special report by Pascale MARIANI and Juan OROZCO
Video editing: John DE LOS RIOS

By Pascale MARIANI , Juan Orozco



2018-03-16 Ireland

Ireland: The forgotten Angels of Tuam

Our reporters returned to Ireland, where the remains of 800 children who died at the Tuam Mother and Baby home in County Galway were found in a mass grave. Our team met with...

Read more

2018-03-02 Americas

Video: What remains of Peru’s Shining Path guerrillas?

Peru’s central Ayacucho region was hit hard by the conflict that plagued the country from the 1980s to 2000. It was the scene of massacres by the Shining Path guerrillas and...

Read more

2018-02-15 Russia

Video: How the 2014 Winter Olympics transformed Sochi

In 2014, the Russian seaside resort of Sochi hosted the Winter Olympics. With a price tag of $50 billion, they were the most expensive Olympic Games ever. The event was intended...

Read more

2018-02-02 Europe

Video: Transnistria, a republic in limbo at the edge of Europe

Transnistria is a rebel republic inside Moldova in the far east of Europe, born from the ashes of the Soviet Union. More than 25 years after a peace agreement was signed in 1992,...

Read more

2018-01-19 Gambia

Video: Gambians reflect on first year of democracy

One year ago, former Gambian dictator Yahya Jammeh waved to his supporters for the last time on the tarmac of Banjul airport before fleeing to Equatorial Guinea, where he still...

Read more