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We meet the people behind fascinating environmental, health and technological innovations in a bid for sustainable solutions to our changing world. Saturday at 7.20 pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2014-05-29

Food waste: Hard to digest

Imagine all the food produced each year and then consider that one third of it is either lost or goes to waste. At the same time, 870 million people go hungry each day. It’s a paradox found in both rich and poor countries and one that the EU is tackling head-on by deeming 2014 the European year against food waste.

This week we head to the community of Herstal in Belgium to meet a mayor who has vowed to stop food being thrown out in his municipality.

In 2012, Frédéric Daerdan implemented a regulation which obliged all supermarkets to donate their unsold, edible food to charitable associations. Despite pockets of resistance from stores which find the rule difficult to administer, there’s now talk of turning the idea into legislation which would apply to more than 5,000 supermarkets in the region of Wallonia.

In most of the rest of Europe, the rules are more flexible. In France, supermarkets are encouraged but not obliged to donate their food. As a result, tons of edible food end up in supermarkets’ rubbish bins every day. We demonstrate the extent of this waste by taking part in a trend known as dumpster diving, which is led by people who prove it’s possible to live comfortably using only discarded food.

By Anna-Gaëlle Brault , Juliette LACHARNAY , Mairead DUNDAS , Marie SCHUSTER , Marina BERTSCH

Archives

2018-06-15 Molly HALL

Iran's water crisis

It's an environmental issue that's become a thorny political problem. Iran has been experiencing severe drought for several years. A growing population, increased water...

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2018-06-01 Marina BERTSCH

France’s disappearing birds

Across France, fields have gone quiet… In 20 years, one-third of the country’s birds have disappeared. Meadow Pipits and Partridges have nearly been wiped out. It’s a...

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2018-05-18 Florence VILLEMINOT

Could thawing permafrost unleash long-gone deadly viruses?

In the remote town of Longyearbyen, in Norway’s Arctic region, the ground is permanently frozen. As temperatures rise, the thawing permafrost could open a Pandora's box, with...

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2018-05-04 Florence VILLEMINOT

Will cleaner air accelerate global warming?

It's probably part of your daily life, even if you don’t notice it. And yet, it kills an estimated seven million people each year. Around the world, countries are waking up and...

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2018-04-20 Florence VILLEMINOT

Can France bid 'adieu' to popular weedkiller glyphosate?

France is Europe's top agricultural producer and also its top consumer of glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in history. Each year, nearly 8,000 tons of it are used in...

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