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Asia-pacific

North Korea’s Kim Jong-un stands in ‘election’

© AFP

Text by FRANCE 24

Latest update : 2014-03-09

North Koreans went to polling stations on Sunday to approve a new national legislature, an exercise that doubles as a national head count and may offer clues to power shifts in Pyongyang.

The vote to elect representatives for the Supreme People's Assembly (SPA) was taking place as scheduled, the state-run KCNA news agency said, adding the voter turnout was about 65 percent as of noon (0300 GMT).

Apart from the physical casting of votes, there is nothing democratic about the ballot. The results are a foregone conclusion, with only one approved candidate standing for each of the 687 districts.

It was the first election to the SPA under the leadership of Kim Jong-Un, who took over the reins of power on the death of his father, Kim Jong-Il, in December 2011.

And like his father before him, Kim stood as a candidate -- in constituency number 111, Mount Paektu.

Koreans have traditionally attributed divine status to Mount Paektu and, according to the North's official propaganda, Kim Jong-Il was born on its slopes.

Clue to power shifts

The real interest for outside observers is the final list of candidates or winners -- both lists being identical.

Many top Korean officials are members of the parliament, and the election is an opportunity to see if any established names are absent.

It comes at a time of heightened speculation over the stability of Kim's regime.

Kim has already overseen sweeping changes within the North's ruling elite -- the most dramatic example being the execution of his powerful uncle and political mentor Jang Song-Thaek in December on charges of treason and corruption.

"It's a chance to see who might be tagged for key roles under Kim Jong-Un," said professor Yang Moo-Jin of the University for North Korean Studies.

"The list of names can also point to what, if any, generational changes have been made and what policy directions Kim Jong-Un might be favouring," Yang said.

Election crackdown on defectors

State newspapers on Sunday stressed it was the duty of "every single person" to vote in the poll. In the absence of any competing candidates, voters are simply required to mark "yes" next to the name on the ballot sheet.

"Let us all cast 'yes' votes," said one of many election banners that state TV showed being put up in the capital Pyongyang.

And they do.

The official turnout at the last election in 2009 was put at 99.98 percent of registered voters, with 100 percent voting for the approved candidate in each seat.

For the North Korean authorities, the vote effectively doubles as a census, as election officials visit every home in the country to ensure all registered voters are present and correct.

"At any other point in the year, family members of missing persons can get away with lying or bribing surveillance agents, saying that the person they are looking for is trading in another district's market," said New Focus International, a defector-run website dedicated to North Korean news.

"But it is during an election period that a North Korean individual's escape to China or South Korea becomes exposed," it said.

Kim Jong-Un has ramped up border security in an effort to curb defections, but more than 1,500 made it to South Korea last year via China.

Ahn Chan-Il, a former defector who heads the World Institute for North Korea Studies in Seoul, said the crackdown was undermining the accuracy of the census, with many local officials not daring to report people missing from their neighbourhood.

"Otherwise, they would find themselves in trouble as it's their responsibility," Ahn told AFP.

Election fanfare

State-run media have in recent weeks stepped up propaganda to promote the election, with a number of poems produced to celebrate voting under titles including "The Billows of Emotion and Happiness" and "We Go To Polling Station."

And despite the lack of drama about results, the voting took place in a holiday atmosphere, with national flags hoisted along the streets, women decked out in colourful traditional clothing and dancing events held in parks, schools and riversides.

The Rodong Sinmun -- mouthpiece of the ruling Workers' Party -- said the election would promote North Korea as a "dignified, prosperous and strong socialist powerhouse".

Elections are normally held every five years to the SPA, which only meets once or twice a year, mostly for a day-long session, to rubber-stamp budgets or other decisions made by the ruling Workers' Party.

(FRANCE 24 with AP, AFP)

Date created : 2014-03-09

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