Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE INTERVIEW

Jean Garrigues, Author and political historian

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

'Macron-economy' pun already worn out

Read more

DEBATE

What Next for Gaza? Lasting Ceasefire Agreed After 50 Days of War

Read more

DEBATE

What Next for Gaza? Lasting Ceasefire Agreed After 50 Days of War (part 2)

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

New French economy minister signals changes to 35-hour week

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Valls ♥ Business

Read more

FOCUS

Video: Milan is starting point for Syrian refugees’ European odyssey

Read more

MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Terrorist ransoms: Should governments pay up for hostages?

Read more

ENCORE!

Kristen Stewart and Juliette Binoche star in 'Clouds of Sils Maria'

Read more

  • Assad cannot be partner in fight against terrorism, says Hollande

    Read more

  • Kiev says Russian troops have entered Ukraine

    Read more

  • New Ebola case in Nigeria brings death toll to 1,552

    Read more

  • Video: 'Neither Baghdad nor the US can defeat the Islamic State'

    Read more

  • Platini will not run against Blatter for FIFA presidency

    Read more

  • Air France pilots announce week-long strike in September

    Read more

  • Erdogan's inauguration paves way for constitutional change

    Read more

  • New French economy minister takes swipe at 35-hour work week

    Read more

  • Air France suspends flights to Ebola-stricken Sierra Leone

    Read more

  • Uzi shooting by 9-year-old rekindles gun debate

    Read more

  • Mother of American journalist asks IS leader for his release

    Read more

  • UN probe accuses Syrian regime, Islamists of ‘crimes against humanity’

    Read more

  • Uruguayans sign up to grow marijuana at home

    Read more

  • Missouri governor appoints black public safety director

    Read more

  • French unemployment rises 0.8% in July to record high

    Read more

  • Video: Iraq’s Yazidis flee to spiritual capital of Lalish

    Read more

  • Video: Milan is starting point for Syrian refugees’ European odyssey

    Read more

  • Airstrikes and Assad - Obama’s military conundrum in Syria

    Read more

Americas

NSA reform shifts data collection to phone companies

© afp

Text by FRANCE 24

Latest update : 2014-03-27

The US on Thursday unveiled plans to end the government's bulk collection of telephone records by calling on phone companies to collect such data instead, with the government only able to access it with court approval or in "emergency" situations.

Coming in response to a global outcry over leaked reports of the extensive monitoring programmes of the National Security Agency (NSA), the new plan would require private telephone companies to provide data from their records quickly and in a usable format when requested to do so by the government, a senior administration official told reporters on condition of anonymity.

Calls for widespread reform of NSA practices followed disclosures about its activities leaked by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden.

Obama said the plan, which still needs congressional approval to come into effect, would allow the government to conduct surveillance to thwart terror attacks while also addressing the public's privacy concerns.

"I have decided that the best path forward is that the government should not collect or hold this data in bulk," Obama said in a statement.

But civil liberties groups said the president's proposals on data collection failed to answer key concerns.

'Emergency' exceptions

The White House said the NSA would need a court order to access the data except in an "emergency situation" that it stopped short of defining.

In such circumstances, the court would be asked to approve requests "based on national security concerns" involving specific telephone numbers that had been linked to suspicious activity.

"This approach will best ensure that we have the information we need to meet our intelligence needs while enhancing public confidence in the manner in which the information is collected and held," Obama said.

Because the new plan would not be in place by a March 28 expiration date, the president said he would seek a 90-day reauthorisation of the existing programme from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC), which oversees government requests for warrants in national security investigations.

"I am confident that this approach can provide our intelligence and law enforcement professionals the information they need to keep us safe while addressing the legitimate privacy concerns that have been raised," he said.

Officials have defended the NSA's methods as necessary to thwart attacks on US and foreign soil, but the sheer scope of the NSA's domestic and international activities has shocked many observers.

A fact sheet released by the White House said that if the plan were implemented, "absent an emergency situation, the government would obtain the records only pursuant to individual orders from the FISC approving the use of specific numbers for such queries, if a judge agrees based on national security concerns".

Amie Stepanovich at the digital rights group Access called Obama's plan "a significant step forward", but said it "fails to address many of the problems with US government surveillance policies and programs, such as the double standard for citizens and those outside of the United States".

(FRANCE 24 with REUTERS and AFP)

Date created : 2014-03-27

  • RUSSIA

    Snowden talks industrial espionage, death threats in German interview

    Read more

  • UK

    Snowden 'put our operations at risk', UK spy chiefs say

    Read more

  • USA

    European governments provided phone data, NSA says

    Read more

COMMENT(S)