Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

#TECH 24

Anonymous Vs ISIS

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Ebola virus: US to send 3,000 troops to West Africa

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Nigeria attack: Bomb blast in college in Kano

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Ebola: Lockdown brings Sierra Leone capital to a halt

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Sarkozy's political comeback: did he ever leave?

Read more

DEBATE

The World This Week

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

Travel chaos: Air France pilots take industrial action

Read more

THE BUSINESS INTERVIEW

Christian Kastrop, Director of Policy Studies, OECD

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Ebola: UN Security Council unanimously passes resolution

Read more

Sydney Convicts tackle homophobia with historic rugby match

AFP

Jeremy Claydon (centre left) of the Sydney Convicts -- an all gay rugby team -- evades a tackle during a match against Macquarie University at the Allianz Stadium in Sydney, on July 6, 2014Jeremy Claydon (centre left) of the Sydney Convicts -- an all gay rugby team -- evades a tackle during a match against Macquarie University at the Allianz Stadium in Sydney, on July 6, 2014

Jeremy Claydon (centre left) of the Sydney Convicts -- an all gay rugby team -- evades a tackle during a match against Macquarie University at the Allianz Stadium in Sydney, on July 6, 2014Jeremy Claydon (centre left) of the Sydney Convicts -- an all gay rugby team -- evades a tackle during a match against Macquarie University at the Allianz Stadium in Sydney, on July 6, 2014

Wallabies great John Eales hailed the courage and spirit of the Sydney Convicts after they became the first gay rugby team in the world Sunday to play on the same bill as a professional match.

The Convicts defeated Macquarie University 30-12 in the curtain-raiser to the New South Wales Waratahs' Super Rugby win over the Otago Highlanders at Sydney's Allianz Stadium.

The game was part of efforts by Australia's professional sports to tackle homophobia.

Eales said Sunday's historic match was a huge step forward for sport in Australia.

"It's always disappointing to hear stories of people who don't play sports because they fear discrimination," the former Wallabies captain and two-time Rugby World Cup winner told reporters at the ground.

"There is no room for homophobia or any other exclusionary behaviour in sports or any other part of society.

"Sports can and must lead society and be welcoming for everyone.

"I'm sure that by holding historic events like this and taking other steps to publicly support gay people, we can help eradicate homophobia and discrimination in sport."

During the main game the stadium's big screen aired an anti-homophobia advertisement featuring prominent Australian sportsmen -- Wallaby David Pocock, Test cricketer Mitchell Johnson, Socceroo Harry Kewell and National Rugby League players Paul Gallen and Nate Myles.

Among the stars in the Convicts' win was scrum-half Jason Fowler, a former Macquarie University player who quit the club and joined the Convicts after fearing his old teammates wouldn't accept him if he "came out".

"Playing at Allianz is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and the entire team is extremely proud and excited to be making history," Fowler said.

"Just two years ago I was afraid to come out of the closet to my teammates. Now I'm playing against them on a gay rugby team as part of a professional sporting event."

While it was an Australian sporting first it was not the first time a gay team has played in a major sporting event in the world.

Paris Foot Gay played a football match against Foot Citoyen as a curtain-raiser to the French Division One game between Paris Saint-Germain and RC Lens at the Parc des Princes stadium in Paris in 2006.

Date created : 2014-07-06