Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE INTERVIEW

Rwandan president claims 'no problem with France'

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Paul Kagame visits UNESCO HQ in Paris

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Flamboyant US Congressman's Instagram Lands Him in Bother

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Compromise buys Greece time and Jihadi John is unmasked (part 2)

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Compromise buys Greece time and Jihadi John is unmasked (part 1)

Read more

#TECH 24

Drone vs. drone

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

The future of agriculture

Read more

REVISITED

Yalta, the symbol of a new Cold War?

Read more

#THE 51%

Women in the workforce: IMF says closing the gender gap makes economic sense

Read more

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 8.40 pm Paris time.

REPORTERS

REPORTERS

Latest update : 2014-07-23

Hong Kong in rebellion against the 'motherland'

In 1997 Hong Kong was proud to re-establish its Chinese identity after more than 150 years under British colonisation. But the atmosphere has changed and Hong Kong is now in open rebellion against the “motherland”. Our correspondent in China, Baptiste Fallevoz, spoke to Hong Kong residents who are defiantly making their voices heard.

Seventeen years ago this July, after a century and a half as a British colony, Hong Kong returned to the Chinese fold in a burst of fireworks. The population of the capitalist enclave looked forward to bright future, basking in its newfound Chinese identity.

But less than two decades later, a wind of rebellion has chilled the atmosphere. People frequently take to the streets in protest marches against the “motherland” and according to a recent poll, barely a third of Hong Kong inhabitants say they are proud to be Chinese citizens. Mainly, they fear for their civil rights.

Under the “one country, two systems” agreement, Hong Kong was to retain a certain amount of freedom after the sovereignty transfer, with civil and economic rights guaranteed until 2047. In theory, its citizens are free to demonstrate, criticise the government, and practice their religion.

But they see these rights eroding, as the Chinese Communist party clamps down on freedom of expression and increases control of the special territory. In response to this crackdown, the inhabitants of Hong Kong are organising a civil disobedience movement, with surprisingly radical elements for such a disciplined city. Some of the younger inhabitants even sound xenophobic, accusing tourists and immigrants from the mainland of saturating the city.

We followed journalists, editors and other members of civil society in their fight for democratic rights, among which some militants who provoke “Chinese invaders” with flags... from the British colonial era!

By Baptiste FALLEVOZ

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2015-02-25 Pakistan

Pakistani Taliban set their sights on police

The Pakistani Taliban are targeting police in Karachi. Over 140 officers were killed last year, most of them victims of targeted assassinations.

Read more

2015-02-20 West Bank

Building in the West Bank

In the West Bank, Jewish settlements continue to expand. Some are authorised by the Israeli government, some not, but all are considered illegal by the international community...

Read more

2015-02-12 Tunisia

Tunisians flock to join the jihad

As Tunisia moves slowly forward on the path to democracy, the country is proportionally one of the biggest exporters of jihadist fighters. Over the past three years thousands of...

Read more

2015-02-05 India

India: the myth of 'Love Jihad'

In India, where religious tensions and violence are on the rise, Hindu extremists are accusing Muslims of practising “Love Jihad”. India’s Muslims deny these accusations and...

Read more

2015-01-16 Charlie Hebdo

Paris attacks: Who were the terrorists?

For three days, they spread fear and horror across France, killing 17 people before being shot dead by police. Their rampage began with an attack on satirical weekly Charlie...

Read more