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Japan volcanic island smouldering and growing

AFP

Picture taken by Japan Coast Guard on July 23, 2014 shows a newly created islet (R) and Nishinoshima island (L), which are conjoined by erupting lava at the Ogasawara island chain, 1,000 kilometres south of TokyoPicture taken by Japan Coast Guard on July 23, 2014 shows a newly created islet (R) and Nishinoshima island (L), which are conjoined by erupting lava at the Ogasawara island chain, 1,000 kilometres south of Tokyo

Picture taken by Japan Coast Guard on July 23, 2014 shows a newly created islet (R) and Nishinoshima island (L), which are conjoined by erupting lava at the Ogasawara island chain, 1,000 kilometres south of TokyoPicture taken by Japan Coast Guard on July 23, 2014 shows a newly created islet (R) and Nishinoshima island (L), which are conjoined by erupting lava at the Ogasawara island chain, 1,000 kilometres south of Tokyo

A volcanic island off Japan's southern coast continues to smoulder with lava flowing from its craters into the sea, new aerial images showed Friday.

Nishinoshima, some 1,000 kilometres (620 miles) south of Tokyo, joined up with a small volcanic islet formed in November and the new mass now measures 1.26 square kilometres (0.49 square miles) around, the Japanese coastguard said.

The agency's images showed a few craters on Nishinoshima spewing columns of smoke 1,500-2,000 metres (4,900-6,600 feet) high as molten lava flowed into the sea, sending clouds of white steam into the sky.

Nishinoshima is estimated to be 10 million years old.

Date created : 2014-07-25