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MEDIAWATCH

Bayrou decides to march with Macron

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THE DEBATE

France's Topsy-Turvy Election: Uncertain outcome as insurgents blow away old guard (part 1)

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THE DEBATE

France's Topsy-Turvy Election: Uncertain outcome as insurgents blow away old guard (part 2)

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THE INTERVIEW

Amnesty chief urges France to 'stay true to its values'

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ENCORE!

Film show: 'Certain Women', 'Rock’n Roll' and 'A Wedding'

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FOCUS

#BringBackOurInternet: English-speaking Cameroon hit by digital blackout

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MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Preaching coexistence: Avant-garde mosque opens in Lebanon's Druze heartland

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THE OBSERVERS

Prison guards turn guns on prisoners in Chile, and thousands of migrants stuck in smoky warehouses in Serbia

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FACE-OFF

French presidential race: Le Pen makes groundbreaking visit to Lebanon

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REPORTERS

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time. And you can watch it online as early as Friday.

Latest update : 2014-08-03

The Depths of Hell: 1914-1918

100 years ago, on August 3rd, 1914, Germany declared war on France. Europe was thrown into chaos, and the world plunged into total war. Machine guns, tanks, toxic gas, planes, artillery: new and increasingly deadly weapons appeared. It was the birth of "modern warfare". From the battles of the Marne to Verdun, our reporters review the Great War, the first major conflict of the twentieth century, which involved over 70 million soldiers, including 60 million from Europe.

International commemorations have begun to honour all those who fought and died in World War One. The so-called 'War to End All Wars' ended up setting the stage for World War Two. It also launched the US as a world super power and fuelled the Russian revolution.

The first global conflict of the twentieth century began almost by accident. A war that was sparked by an assassin's bullet on the streets of Sarajevo.

France 24 looks back at the main moments of World War One along the Western Front, examining the major battles of Verdun and the Somme but also looking at the innovations the war incited.

The Great War was also the first industrial war. It was the first time soldiers were faced with artillery fire and machine guns. It saw the first use of poison gas (at Ypres in 1915) and the arrival of tanks on the battlefields, in 1916. It prompted the world's first ever skin graft as doctors tried to treat injuries that were worse than anyone could have imagined from anything that came before. From the trenches to the munition factories, France 24 takes you on an historic trip of the Western Front.

By Alexandra RENARD , Eve IRVINE

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2017-02-16 Asia-pacific

Thailand still mourning its beloved King Bhumibol

He was the world’s richest monarch – wealthier than Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II - and the longest-serving, spending 70 years on the throne. Thailand’s King Bhumibol Adulyadej,...

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2017-02-09 Africa

Rose Nathike: S. Sudan athlete’s race for a better life

For Rose Nathike, running is a way of life. First the South Sudanese athlete ran to flee the war in Sudan. Then she trained at her refugee camp in northern Kenya. Finally she...

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2017-02-02 jihad

Video: Jihad Sisters, French women bound for ISIS

France 24 brings you an exceptional documentary in partnership with French TV news magazine "Envoyé spécial", on the hidden women of the jihadist web, the "sisters" of the...

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2017-01-26 Asia-pacific

Flight MH370: Families of missing passengers search for the truth

It’s a unique case in the history of modern aviation. Nearly three years after its disappearance, Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, a Boeing 777 with 239 people on board, has still...

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2017-01-19 Burundi

Burundi: Fear and Exile

When Burundi’s President Pierre Nkurunziza announced he was running for a controversial third mandate in April 2015, he sparked a major crisis and many demonstrations. Since...

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