Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

IN THE PAPERS

'Valls is starting to act like Hollande'

Read more

THE BUSINESS INTERVIEW

Inger Andersen, Vice President for the Middle East and North Africa, The World Bank

Read more

WEB NEWS

Wikileaks releases 'weaponized malware' customer list

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Salmond's 'emotional eve-of poll plea to Scots to seize their historic opportunity'

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Ukraine politician thrown on rubbish heap

Read more

DEBATE

Hollande on his own? Socialist backbenchers abstain on confidence vote (part 2)

Read more

DEBATE

Hollande on his own? Socialist backbenchers abstain on confidence vote

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Patrick Chauvel, French war photographer

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Scottish fishing industry divided over independence

Read more

Pentagon cites progress destroying Syria chemical arms

AFP

Containers of Syrian chemical weapons are transferred from a Danish freighter to a US military ship ahead of their destruction at sea on July 2, 2014 in the port of Gioia Tauro, southern ItalyContainers of Syrian chemical weapons are transferred from a Danish freighter to a US military ship ahead of their destruction at sea on July 2, 2014 in the port of Gioia Tauro, southern Italy

Containers of Syrian chemical weapons are transferred from a Danish freighter to a US military ship ahead of their destruction at sea on July 2, 2014 in the port of Gioia Tauro, southern ItalyContainers of Syrian chemical weapons are transferred from a Danish freighter to a US military ship ahead of their destruction at sea on July 2, 2014 in the port of Gioia Tauro, southern Italy

The Pentagon said Tuesday it had made progress in destroying Syrian chemical weapons, saying specialists on a US military ship had neutralized "100 percent" of a precursor used to make lethal Sarin gas.

After a global outcry over deadly chemical attacks in a Damascus suburb last year that may have killed as many as 1,400 people, President Bashar al-Assad's regime agreed to an international plan to destroy its stockpile.

"I am pleased to announce that the crew aboard Cape Ray has completed neutralization of 100 percent of the sarin precursor aboard the ship, which amounts to about 581 metric tons neutralized," Pentagon spokesman Colonel Steve Warren said.

He added that the crew is now beginning to neutralize 19.8 tons of sulfur mustard.

The destruction of these agents by hydrolysis began in early July and, according to the Pentagon, should be completed by the end of August.

With no country ready to accept shipments of the most lethal chemical agents, the United States proposed destroying the chemicals at sea using two "portable" hydrolysis units.

The process calls for mixing the chemicals in sealed containers with thousands of gallons of hot water along with sodium hydroxide or other "reagents" that help break down the toxicity of the chemical.

The resulting effluent, which is the equivalent to industrial waste, will be transported to plants on land for disposal.

Officials say none of the chemicals or waste will be dumped at sea.

Other chemical agents from Syria are being destroyed on land at special facilities in Britain, Finland and the United States.

Date created : 2014-08-12