Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

Media response to Ottawa shooting

Read more

DEBATE

Canada's jihadists : country in shock after spate of attacks (part 2)

Read more

DEBATE

Canada's jihadists : country in shock after spate of attacks

Read more

FOCUS

Religious education claims bigger role in curriculum

Read more

THE BUSINESS INTERVIEW

Daniele Balice, Co-founder of the gallery 'Balice Hertling'

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Burkina Faso: Government seeks referendum

Read more

ENCORE!

All the fun of the FIAC: Contemporary art fair rolls into town

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Whistleblower James Wasserstrom slams UN over its failure to fight corruption

Read more

LIFESTYLES

New garden concepts

Read more

'Terror' tunnel found near Yemen ex-president home

© AFP/File | Ousted Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh waves as he attends a ceremony marking the 30th anniversary of the establishment of Yemen's ruling party, the General People's Congress, in Sanaa on September 3, 2012Ousted Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh waves as he attends a ceremony marking the 30th anniversary of the establishment of Yemen's ruling party, the General People's Congress, in Sanaa on September 3, 2012

Yemeni authorities are investigating a tunnel dug near ex-president Ali Abdullah Saleh's residence, the official news agency reported Tuesday, as his party charged it was an assassination plot.

Former strongman Saleh ruled Yemen for 33 years before being forced out in February 2012 and replaced by his deputy, Abdrabuh Mansur Hadi, under a UN- and Gulf-sponsored deal.

"The Supreme Security Committee received a complaint on Monday about a tunnel and excavation works near the residence of former president Ali Abdullah Saleh," Saba reported, quoting a committee official.

"Security services immediately began legal measures and collecting evidence" from the site, on orders from President Hadi, it said.

The 88-metre (290-foot) tunnel was connected to a hangar north of Saleh's residence.

A committee was formed to "identify the motives and parties" behind the tunnel, Saba said.

The powerful General People's Congress party, which is still headed by Saleh, said: "We were surprised to discover an organised terrorist act targeting the nation's security, stability and unity."

The tunnel was designed to "carry out a terrorist act" targeting Saleh's "life, family, his security guards and leadership" of the party, the GPC said on its website.

The party likened the alleged plot to a June 3, 2011 explosion in his presidential compound that wounded Saleh and killed 11 people.

Critics accuse Saleh of impeding the political transition in the deeply tribal country, which is facing threats from Al-Qaeda, a northern Shiite rebellion and a southern secessionist movement.