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FOCUS

Training future football champions in Vietnam

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ENCORE!

Guitar Hero: Johnny Marr brings solo work to the stage in Paris

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THE INTERVIEW

Presidential meeting signals 'another chapter' in Franco-Rwandan relations

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THE DEBATE

Macron courts tech giants during Paris summit

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PEOPLE & PROFIT

Trade truce: US-China tensions cool, but is a trade war still possible?

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BUSINESS DAILY

Viva Technology conference opens in Paris as Macron seeks French dominance

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IN THE PRESS

Does the NFL's new ultimatum on kneeling pander to Donald Trump?

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IN THE PRESS

What's in a name? France moves to protect regional term for chocolate croissant

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EYE ON AFRICA

Macron and Kagame meet to repair strained ties over Rwandan genocide

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DOWN TO EARTH

We meet the people behind fascinating environmental, health and technological innovations in a bid for sustainable solutions to our changing world. Saturday at 7.20 pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2014-10-27

Climate therapy

Greenhouse gas emissions are rising at the fastest rate in three decades. Meteorologists warn the world is running out of time. In this episode, the Down to Earth team explores innovative solutions to halt carbon dioxide output and rein in climate change.

In Washington, one woman has challenged herself to raise a baby with a zero carbon footprint, and succeeded.

While cutting emissions is a priority, scientists and engineers are also looking at techniques to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

From a coal-fired power plant in Canada to a car that can run on fuel using CO2 plucked from the air, we investigate whether it’s time to consider a climate technofix.

The ultimate technological fix is known as geoengineering, described as a deliberate large-scale intervention in the Earth's climate system. Those in favour want to halt global warming by limiting the amount of sunlight that reaches the earth, using giant space mirrors, reflective clouds or by spraying sulphuric acid into the upper atmosphere.

By Marina BERTSCH , Mairead DUNDAS

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Archives

2018-05-18 environment

Could thawing permafrost unleash long-gone deadly viruses?

In the remote town of Longyearbyen, in Norway’s Arctic region, the ground is permanently frozen. As temperatures rise, the thawing permafrost could open a Pandora's box, with...

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2018-05-04 pollution

Will cleaner air accelerate global warming?

It's probably part of your daily life, even if you don’t notice it. And yet, it kills an estimated seven million people each year. Around the world, countries are waking up and...

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2018-04-17 agriculture

Can France bid 'adieu' to popular weedkiller glyphosate?

France is Europe's top agricultural producer and also its top consumer of glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in history. Each year, nearly 8,000 tons of it are used in...

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2018-04-03 climate change

Can the courtroom save the planet?

The planet may have found its newest and perhaps greatest ally: the law. In the past three years, the number of climate-related lawsuits across the world has tripled. In 2017,...

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2018-03-20 Germany

German villages sacrificed in the name of coal

In Germany, one of Europe’s largest coal mines is gaining ground, destroying dozens of villages in its path. Some 35,000 people have already been relocated and 24 new villages...

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