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Who's afraid of the 'Equation Group'?

Text by Claire WILLIAMS , Farah BOUCHERAK , in Cancun (Mexico)

Latest update : 2015-02-24

A Russian security firm says it has discovered a cyberattack team with tools and techniques that go beyond anything it has ever tracked or witnessed.

Kaspersky Lab unveiled details of the so-called 'Equation Group' at the company's annual Security Analyst Summit in Cancun this week.

Researchers claimed the Equation Group retrieves data and hides its activity in an "outstandingly professional way" by entirely reprogramming a computer's hard drive. Even air-gapped computers not connected to the internet are at risk. For up to two decades, the Equation Group has infected its victims using Trojans with names like Fanny, Grayfish and DoubleFantasy.

Kaspersky's Global Research and Analysis Team (GReAT) stopped short of accusing the United States' National Security Agency (NSA) of being behind the Equation Group. But, it suggested the Equation Group was also responsible for the Stuxnet cyberattack widely suspected to have been the handiwork of the NSA and Israel. Five years ago, Kaspersky Lab helped uncover Stuxnet, a worm designed to sabotage devices within Iran's nuclear facilities.

 

Date created : 2015-02-21

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