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South Sudan: A rare look at both sides of the civil war

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THE INTERVIEW

Former UK police chief: 'We are facing disorganised terrorism'

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ENCORE!

Diana Krall: 'I find romance in everything'

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IN THE PAPERS

Saudi Arabia's 'Prince of Chaos'

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IN THE PAPERS

Macron's government, take two: 'Reviewed and corrected'

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INSIDE THE AMERICAS

Travis Kalanick: Uber boss steps down amid controversy

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BUSINESS DAILY

Oil price tumbles to lowest level of year

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BUSINESS DAILY

With Kalanick out, what's next for Uber?

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THE DEBATE

Queen's Speech: Monarch outlines two-year plan as Brexit looms

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FRENCH CONNECTIONS

A quirky, insider’s guide to understanding France and the French, from the sublime to the ridiculous. Thursday at 1.45 pm.

Latest update : 2016-01-14

French rules of etiquette: 'Bonne année' and ‘La bise’

FRENCH CONNECTIONS – Thurs. 14.01.16: This week we take a look at some of the rules of French etiquette - from how to say "Bonne année" to the dos and don’ts of doing "la bise".

We're well into the month of January, but you'll still hear people wishing each other Happy New Year - "Bonne année". French people take saying Bonne année very seriously and there are some cardinal rules you must follow.

Just like for saying Bonne année, there are rules for doing "la bise", the traditional - kissing - way of saying hello, goodbye and congratulations to friends and family in France.

"La bise" can be awkward and confusing to people new to France. Where do you put your hands? What side do you start on? How many kisses do you give? And what noise do you make? I team up with FRANCE 24’s Business Editor Stephen Carroll to bring you a crash course on "la bise".

Finally, we focus on another January tradition: king cake. Traditionally eaten on January 6 to celebrate Epiphany, king cake (La galette des rois) is enjoyed throughout the month. Not only is it delicious, it’s also fun! In each cake, there is a porcelain charm or trinket (la fève). Whoever finds it in their slice is king or queen for the day.

By Florence VILLEMINOT

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Archives

2017-05-11 French politics

Triangles, voter fatigue and the Bourbon Palace: French parliamentary elections

This week, we explore French parliamentary elections, the so-called "third round" of the presidential race. The rules to becoming MP are quite particular in France. Though...

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2017-06-02 France

Are French high schoolers extra smart?

French people love to brag that the Baccalaureate is the hardest end of high school exam in the world. But with so many people passing it, has it lost its value? We take a closer...

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2017-05-18 French Legislative Elections 2017

Are French politicians paid too much?

This week FRANCE 24 takes a closer look at France’s 577 members of parliament. Elected for 5-year terms, they split their time between the stunning Palais Bourbon in Paris and...

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2017-03-30 France

Is the French language in danger from an English invasion?

Once the language of diplomacy, French remains the official language in nearly 30 countries and is the second-most-studied foreign language in the world. But despite all this, is...

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2017-03-09 French Presidential Elections 2017

From spending caps to limited airtime: The rules of running for president in France

FRENCH CONNECTIONS – Thurs. 09.03.17: This week, we take a look behind the scenes of the French presidential campaign, which has some pretty strict rules. For example, a limit on...

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