Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

FRANCE IN FOCUS

French presidential election: Over 40% remain undecided

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

ICC orders Congo warlord germain Katanga to pay victims

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Trumpcare Falls Before First Hurdle

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Westminster Attack, Abadi in Washington (part 1)

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Obamacare, Europe's Unholy Alliances, Martin McGuinness (part 2)

Read more

INSIDE THE AMERICAS

Export bans hit Brazil amid tainted meat scandal

Read more

#TECH 24

Inside Netflix's war room

Read more

FOCUS

French Catholic voters remain faithful to scandal-hit Fillon

Read more

PEOPLE & PROFIT

Growing ambitions: The forces driving India's economy

Read more

Americas

Demonstrators in Haiti hit the streets over political crisis

© AFP | Supporters of ruling party candidate Jovenel Moise at a march in Port-au-Prince, Haiti on February 2, 2016.

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2016-02-03

Hundreds of Haitians took to the streets Tuesday to protest against a potential transitional government, with President Michel Martelly due to leave office but not yet replaced.

Martelly’s term ends on Sunday. With no successor in place, Haiti is in constitutional crisis again after the January 24 presidential vote runoff was cancelled over security concerns. His favoured candidate, little-known Jovenel Moise, won October’s first round with about a third of the vote and remains the favourite.

But opposition flag-bearer Jude Celestin was close behind and refused to campaign ahead of the second vote, alleging the government was working against him.

The failure to carry out a runoff has fuelled fears that Martelly will try to stay on, or that a transitional authority will be imposed.

“The opposition has no clue. They don’t even exist for me. I don’t want a transition with them. I want an election,” said Moise supporter Cheney Robeus.

“The legislature is going to extend the president’s term, what else can they do? He can’t just leave, and then we have a void. We could have elections within three months.”

In the first round of presidential voting on October 25, Moise officially won 32.76 percent of the vote, to 25.29 percent for Celestin, who denounced those results as a “ridiculous farce.”

Thirty years after the end of the Duvalier dictatorship, Haiti—the poorest country in the Americas—is still struggling to organise uncontested elections and overcome the apathy of a disaffected populace.

(AFP)
 

Date created : 2016-02-03

  • HAITI

    Protesters clash with police as Haiti elections postponed

    Read more

  • HAITI

    Haiti presidential election postponed over security concerns

    Read more

  • HAITI

    Haiti to hold presidential runoff vote despite outcry

    Read more

COMMENT(S)