Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE DEBATE

Davos Debate: Getting a fair share from multinationals

Read more

THE DEBATE

Davos Debate: Getting a fair share from multinationals (part 2)

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Adama Barrow sworn in as President, Ecowas forces enter Gambia

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

DAVOS 2017: Trump 'could hit the ball out of the park'

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

DAVOS 2017: May's Brexit plan 'not realistic'

Read more

THE DEBATE

Showdown in Gambia: Foreign troops at border as Jammeh refuses to go (part 1)

Read more

THE DEBATE

Showdown in Gambia: Senegalese troops enter Country as Jammeh refuses to go (part 2)

Read more

PEOPLE & PROFIT

Davos 2017: Global leaders try to understand populist surge

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

DAVOS 2017: What next for the global healthcare industry?

Read more

REVISITED

We return to places which have been in the news - often a long time ago, sometimes recently - to see how local people are rebuilding their lives. Sunday at 9.10 pm. And you can watch it online as early as Friday.

Latest update : 2016-02-19

Mexico: Ciudad Juarez, the city of missing women

Ciudad Juarez, which Pope Francis has just visited, was long considered the most dangerous city in the world. A city plagued by cartel wars, drug trafficking, violence... and femicides. In the past few decades, thousands of women have been murdered. The bodies of hundreds of them have been found buried in the desert, horribly mutilated. These crimes remain unsolved to this day. Our reporters returned to Ciudad Juarez to meet the mothers of these missing women, who are fighting for justice.

In Ciudad Juarez, some mothers are searching for their daughters and others are mourning them. According to authorities, nearly 1,500 women have been murdered in the city, on the Mexican border with the United States, since the mid-1990s. But Paula (pictured), the mother of Sagrario, who was killed in 1998, is convinced there were many more. When the phenomenon began, in around 1993 or 1994, families were often afraid to speak out and left the city without seeking justice.

In the media today, this wave of femicides no longer receives the same coverage as it did in the late 1990s. However, the problem is far from solved: since the beginning of the year, the authorities admit that eight more young girls have disappeared.

Although various theories abound and there have been many investigations, the mystery of the missing women of Ciudad Juarez has never been solved. Those arrested claim their innocence.

In this city where bars and table dancing attract Americans in seach of less regulated sexual services, where Mexican criminals readily cross the US border a few kilometres away to escape local justice, and where it is now proven that head honchos of prostitution rings have benefited from the complicity of the local police, the girls keep disappearing, one by one, in silence.

By Matthieu COMIN , Laurence CUVILLIER

Archives

2017-01-06 South Sudan

S. Sudan: World’s youngest nation faces bleak future

More than five years after its independence, South Sudan, the world’s youngest nation, is plagued by civil war. The regular army and rebel troops have been fighting since 2013....

Read more

2016-12-16 Africa

DR Congo: Goma, a city living on the edge

Nearly 15 years after the deadly eruption of the Nyiragongo volcano and four years after the M23 rebel offensive, Goma is still tending its wounds. Amid uneven reconstruction...

Read more

2016-11-18 Iran

A decade after quake, Iran heritage site waits for tourists

A major earthquake devastated the UNESCO world heritage city of Bam in Iran in December 2003. 26,000 people died and 30,000 were injured. Much of the city was destroyed,...

Read more

2016-11-04 Italy

Residents of quake-hit Italian city still waiting to go home

With Italy still reeling from a series of earthquakes that started in August, FRANCE 24 returned to the city of L'Aquila, which was devastated by a massive quake in 2009. Seven...

Read more

2016-10-27 Barack Obama

Video: Chicago residents take a stand to end violence

As Barack Obama’s second and final term draws to a close, our reporter returned to Chicago, the adopted hometown of the first black president of the United States. Despite an...

Read more