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MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

From Turkey to Iran: (re)inventing kebab

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THE INTERVIEW

Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara: ‘Dinosaurs were the last great champions’

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THE INTERVIEW

Alan Turing's nephew: ‘A Shakespearean tragedy surrounded his life’

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EYE ON AFRICA

Zimbabwe: Chamisa's lawyers contest election results in court

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THE WORLD THIS WEEK

New US sanctions on Iran: Trump ups pressure after exiting nuclear deal

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IN THE PRESS

‘Space Farce’? Alternative logos for new US military branch flood social media

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EYE ON AFRICA

Zambia accused of illegal handover of Zimbabwean opposition figure

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MEDIAWATCH

#MyCameraIsMyWeapon campaign takes on Iran's mandatory hijab law

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THE DEBATE

Headed for war? Israel-Gaza conflict flares despite truce talks

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REVISITED

We return to places which have been in the news - often a long time ago, sometimes recently - to see how local people are rebuilding their lives. Sunday at 9.10 pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2016-03-25

Video: What remains of the utopia of Brasilia?

In the 1950s, those who designed and built the man-made capital of Brasilia had dreamed of a city capable of offering a better life to its people. What remains of these ideals? Built for 500,000 inhabitants, it is now home to three million. Brasilia is bursting at the seams and is now the capital of a country shaken by social change and a deep crisis of confidence in its political class.

Built in just a thousand days, Brasilia was the brainchild of President Juscelino Kubitschek. The city was supposed to attract economic development to the centre of the country, far from the coastal cities of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo.

But more than that, Brasilia represented a new social order, a socialist political project based on egalitarian ideas. A utopia which would give access to housing, job creation, a good standard of living and social integration. The towering monuments of architect Oscar Niemeyer have divided opinion. Brasilia gives a whole new meaning to modernity.

Today, the capital is growing three times faster than any other city in Brazil. It was originally designed for 500,000 people. By 2030 the population is expected to reach 5.6 million, 15 times more than that originally envisaged by urban planner Lucio Costa. What remains today of the values and egalitarian vision of its builders?

By Marlène HABERARD , Nicolas RANSOM , Thadeu PRADO

Archives

2018-06-22 Asia-pacific

Video: Shenzhen, from fishing port to China’s Silicon Valley

As French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe begins a four-day visit to China in the south-eastern city of Shenzhen, our team reports from this former fishing village that’s been...

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2018-06-08 Achraf ABID

Video: What remains of multicultural France that won 1998 World Cup?

Most French people remember where they were on the night of July 12, 1998. That’s when France was crowned the winner of the football World Cup, after beating Brazil 3-0. After...

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2018-05-25 Middle East

After key battle, Syrian town of Kobane looks to the future

In 2014, the Syrian town of Kobane was the scene of a long and deadly battle involving the Islamic State group, Kurdish YPG forces and the US-led coalition.

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2018-05-11 Africa

Video: Ten years on, what remains of Somalia's 'Pirateland'?

A decade ago, Somali pirates were frequently in the headlines for hijacking boats and holding their crews for ransom. The epicentre of the piracy crisis was Somalia's...

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2018-04-27 Americas

Video: California residents prepare for 'the Big One'

All Californians are aware that one day "the Big One" – a massive earthquake – will hit the San Francisco Bay area. According to experts, there is a 90 percent probability that...

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