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Paris attacks suspect Abdeslam refuses to speak in court, again

© AFP | Key Paris attacks suspect Salah Abdeslam.

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2016-11-29

French investigators have tried and failed – again – to persuade Paris attacks suspect Salah Abdeslam to talk to anti-terrorism investigators.

Paris prosecutor's office spokeswoman Agnes Thibault-Lecuivre said Abdeslam was brought before an anti-terrorism judge Tuesday for a new interrogation effort. She said that Abdeslam refused to respond to the judge's questions.

He didn't request a new lawyer either. Abdeslam's former lawyers stopped defending him because of his ongoing refusal to speak.

He initially said he wanted to explain his path to radicalization and his role in the November 2015 Islamic State attacks, but has since chosen to remain silent to protest 24-hour surveillance of his prison cell and his solitary confinement.

Investigators hope he can shed light on the plot and his role in the attacks, which killed 130 people.

(AP)

Date created : 2016-11-29

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