Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

BUSINESS DAILY

EU fines Google €2.4bn over shopping service

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Latest hack sends jitters through cyberspace

Read more

THE DEBATE

Farewell to arms? Crucial Step for Colombia peace process (full debate)

Read more

THE POLITICAL BRIEF

Could France's Macron be Europe's climate hero?

Read more

FOCUS

Russia cracks down on hooligans ahead of 2018 World Cup

Read more

ENCORE!

Award-winning author Lionel Shriver: Trump 'stole my idea'

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

DR Congo authorities find ten more mass graves in Kasai

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Poll suggests Trump presidency takes toll on US image abroad

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

France's new parliament: 'Debutante ball' at the Bourbon Palace

Read more

Golf: Judge says Singh case against PGA should go to trial

© GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA/AFP/File | Vijay Singh of Fiji plays his shot from the third tee during the final round of THE PLAYERS Championship at the Stadium course at TPC Sawgrass on May 14, 2017 in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida

NEW YORK (AFP) - 

A New York State Supreme Court judge has ruled that a lawsuit by former world number one Vijay Singh of Fiji against the US PGA Tour should go to trial.

Judge Eileen Bransten partially denied the tour's request for a summary judgment on the case filed by Singh in May 2013 in which the three-time major champion, now 54, claimed the tour "recklessly administered its anti-doping program."

Singh claimed the US PGA Tour unfairly suspended him for using deer-antler spray that contained the banned substance IGF-1, something he admitted doing in a January 2013 Sports Illustrated article.

Singh said the tour banned him before consulting with the World Anti-Doping Agency, which ruled the deer-antler spray was not a violation if there was no failed drug test.

The tour dropped the disciplinary acion against Singh, but Singh argued there was damage done to his reputation.

"It is up to a jury to determine whether (the PGA Tour's) decision to not consult the WADA and/or ignore WADA studies and findings prior to (Singh's) suspension concerning deer-antler spray constitute an 'appropriate' investigation," Bransten wrote.

She also said that "the extent of damages, if any, should be assessed and decided at trial" and that the issue of whether or not comments by tour officials violated good faith expectations "remains viable."

© 2017 AFP