Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

French Riviera's raging fires

Read more

THE DEBATE

Poland Judicial Reforms: EU keeping door open to sanctions on Warsaw

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Libyan PM: 'We need UN's support to hold vote'

Read more

MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Dubai: Taking a dip into the Emirate's underwater world

Read more

ENCORE!

Film show: 'Valerian', 'A Violent Life' and 'Belle de Jour'

Read more

FOCUS

The limits of affirmative action in Brazil

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Rival Libyan leaders back ceasefire, elections

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Western men 'less fertile' due to modern living, scientists warn

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

A 'crazy gamble': Luc Besson's €197m blockbuster 'Valerian' hits French cinemas

Read more

Germany urges 'serious dialogue' to resolve Qatar crisis

© AFP | Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Egypt accuse Qatar of supporting extremism and of being too close to regional arch-rival Iran, which Doha has strongly denied

BERLIN (AFP) - 

German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel, who on Monday starts a tour of several Arab states, called for a "serious dialogue" to end the crisis following the de facto blockade of Qatar by its neighbours.

"Since many weeks, the brotherly countries and neighbours of the Arabian peninsula have been locked in a conflict that has fuelled concern," Gabriel said in a statement.

"We are worried that the distrust and the disunity could weaken all the parties concerned as well as the entire peninsula," said Gabriel, who will visit Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar.

Gabriel called for a "serious dialogue between the parties" to resolve the crisis, adding that while Berlin was "not taking sides, the conflict... affects both us and our interests."

"This is true of the fight against the Islamic State but also for the stability of a region that has been particularly marked by crises, tensions and war."

Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt announced on June 5 they were severing ties with their Gulf neighbour, sparking the worst diplomatic crisis to hit the region in decades.

They accused Doha of supporting extremism and of being too close to regional arch-rival Iran, which Qatar has strongly denied.

The crisis has raised concerns of growing instability in the region, home to some of the world's largest energy producers and several key Western allies hosting US military facilities.

On June 22 the Arab states presented a list of demands and gave Doha 10 days to comply. The ultimatum is expected to expire at the end of the day on Sunday, though the deadline has not been officially confirmed.

Riyadh's demands include Doha ending support for the Muslim Brotherhood, the closure of Al-Jazeera television, a downgrade of diplomatic ties with Iran and the shutdown of a Turkish military base in the emirate.

© 2017 AFP