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Country legend Loretta Lynn pushes back album after stroke

© GETTY/AFP/File | Country music legend Loretta Lynn won a fan base with songs that highlight the woes of white Southern women faced with philandering and floundering husbands

NEW YORK (AFP) - 

Country music legend Loretta Lynn on Wednesday delayed her upcoming album and tour following a stroke but said she was steadily recovering.

The 85-year-old singer, one of the pioneering women in country whose fashion trademark is her floor-length gowns, suffered a stroke in May at her ranch in Tennessee.

She has remained active despite her age and her latest album "Wouldn't It Be Great" -- her second since 2016 -- was scheduled to come out in August.

"I now want to wait to release it next year because this record is so special for me. It deserves me at my best and I can't wait to share it," Lynn said in a statement on her website.

"I want to thank everyone for hanging in there with me. I am getting stronger every day and can't wait to get back out there with all of you," she said.

Lynn also canceled a series of upcoming concerts that had been due to kick off next week in Dubuque, Iowa.

Lynn -- a protegee of Patsy Cline, who broke through the gender barrier in country music -- has won a fan base with songs that highlight the woes of white Southern women faced with philandering and floundering husbands.

With songs such as "Don't Come A' Drinkin' (With Lovin' on Your Mind)" and "The Pill," she both took up changes in society but distanced herself from modern feminism.

Staying true to country music's conservative base, she has been one of the rare prominent US entertainers to support President Donald Trump enthusiastically.

© 2017 AFP