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US military bases can now shoot down private drones

© AFP/File | "We retain the right of self-defense and when it comes to ... drones operating over military installations," said Pentagon spokesman Navy Captain Jeff Davis

WASHINGTON (AFP) - 

The Pentagon has issued new guidance to the military allowing installations in the United States to shoot down commercial or private drones deemed a threat, officials said Monday.

Pentagon spokesman Navy Captain Jeff Davis said the various branches of the military had received the new guidance on Friday, and this would be passed on to bases.

While details of the new policy remain classified, Davis said personnel on bases designated no-fly areas can now tackle unmanned aircraft that are deemed a threat to people, facilities or other assets.

"We retain the right of self-defense and when it comes to ... drones operating over military installations, this new guidance does afford us the ability to take action to stop those threats," Davis said.

"That includes disabling, destroying, tracking."

All drone activities within the United States must follow Federal Aviation Administration rules and guidelines.

Prominent locations -- including the Pentagon and Washington -- are already "no drone zones."

© 2017 AFP