Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

EYE ON AFRICA

President Robert Mugabe emerges from house arrest

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Harassment and hypocrisy in Washington

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Military pressures Robert Mugabe to step down, Macron mediates Lebanon crisis

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

France raises a glass to tourism

Read more

FOCUS

France's newest political party accused of 'old' methods

Read more

#THE 51%

Hear me roar: The growing economic power of older women

Read more

#TECH 24

The future of surgery

Read more

DOWN TO EARTH

The tiny parasite threatening your salmon sushi

Read more

ENCORE!

Director Joachim Trier: True horror is a 'lack of self-acceptance'

Read more

Culture

Louvre starts crowdfunding campaign to fund prayer book’s return to France

© Ludovic Marin, AFP | Pedestrians walk near the Louvre Museum and Pyramid in Paris on October 6, 2017

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2017-10-25

The Louvre museum in Paris is calling on the public to help bring back one of the French Renaissance’s greatest decorative works of art.

The Book of Hours prayer book - a manuscript bound in gold and encrusted with emerald, ruby and turquoise gemstones - belonged to France’s King Francis I, who gifted the treasure to his 10-year-old niece during the 16th century.

Deemed by experts to be a masterpiece, the book now belongs to a private collector in Britain.

The Louvre says it needs 10 million euros ($11.8 million) to acquire the piece. Luxury group LVMH has pledged half of the money. The museum hopes to raise the rest through a crowdfunding campaign and donations from companies.

Louvre President Jean-Luc Martinez says the Book of Hours would become one of the Louvre’s iconic pieces alongside the Mona Lisa.

(AP)

Date created : 2017-10-25

  • CULTURE

    'Nude Mona Lisa' may have been drawn by Leonardo da Vinci

    Read more

  • FRANCE-ART

    Video: Vermeer masterpieces brought together in Paris for rare show

    Read more

  • FRANCE

    Louvre Museum reopens as France flood damage bill tops €1bn

    Read more

COMMENT(S)