Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

BUSINESS DAILY

UK looks to calm Brexit fears at Farnborough Airshow

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Nigeria: Army denies reports of missing soldiers after Boko Haram attacks

Read more

FOCUS

Despite economic blockade and corruption scandals, Qatar prepares for its 2022 World Cup

Read more

ENCORE!

Beatmaker & singer Estère brings her musical melting pot to Afropunk Paris

Read more

THE OBSERVERS

Iran water shortages, street art in Yemen, and more

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

Maltese foreign minister: ‘We need to implement legal paths of migration into Europe’

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

FIFA takes home revenue of over €5 billion from World Cup

Read more

IN THE PRESS

Les Bleus 2018: The new 'tsars' of world football

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

Eurogroup chief Centeno: ‘We need to an end what seems to be a trade war’

Read more

REVISITED

We return to places which have been in the news - often a long time ago, sometimes recently - to see how local people are rebuilding their lives. Sunday at 9.10 pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2017-12-08

Video: Tahrir Square, a melting pot for Egyptian revolutions

Egypt’s Tahrir Square is emblematic of the Arab Spring uprising. In January 2011, thousands of Egyptians thronged onto the Cairo square to protest society-wide corruption and police brutality. Today, and despite the country’s financial crisis, some Arab Spring participants still converge there in a bid to relay their revolutionary ideas to new generations...

In Cairo, there is not a single person who hasn’t heard of Tahrir Square. It all began on Jan. 25, 2011, when several thousand Egyptians gathered there to protest police brutality. What had initially been planned as one day of rallying turned into three weeks of protests - not to mention the “million-man march” - which would bring anti-government activists together not only in Cairo, but all over Egypt.

The protesters would pay a steep price, however: during their 18 days of protests, more than 850 people were killed, and 6,000 people were injured. But on Feb. 11, 2011, they finally achieved what they no longer thought possible: President Hosni Mubarak stepped down after more than 30 years in power.

Two-and-a-half years went by, and the calm slowly seemed to be returning to the square. The army had been put in charge of handling the transition process and the Islamist Mohammed Morsi was democratically elected president. But in June 2013, Morsi’s supporters and critics began a month-long stand-off on the square, and in July Morsi was finally removed from power. General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi was elected president one year later, and has since ruled Egypt with an iron first.

Although the 2011 revolution might seem like a long time ago, some of those who made it happen still try to keep the revolutionary spirit of Tahrir Square alive, despite the repression they face in doing so. Our reporters, Nadia Bléty, Éric de Lavarène and Claire Williot went to meet them.

By Nadia BLETRY , Eric DE LAVARÈNE , Claire WILLIOT

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2018-06-22 Asia-pacific

Video: Shenzhen, from fishing port to China’s Silicon Valley

As French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe begins a four-day visit to China in the south-eastern city of Shenzhen, our team reports from this former fishing village that’s been...

Read more

2018-06-08 Achraf ABID

Video: What remains of multicultural France that won 1998 World Cup?

Most French people remember where they were on the night of July 12, 1998. That’s when France was crowned the winner of the football World Cup, after beating Brazil 3-0. After...

Read more

2018-05-25 Middle East

After key battle, Syrian town of Kobane looks to the future

In 2014, the Syrian town of Kobane was the scene of a long and deadly battle involving the Islamic State group, Kurdish YPG forces and the US-led coalition.

Read more

2018-05-11 Africa

Video: Ten years on, what remains of Somalia's 'Pirateland'?

A decade ago, Somali pirates were frequently in the headlines for hijacking boats and holding their crews for ransom. The epicentre of the piracy crisis was Somalia's...

Read more

2018-04-27 Americas

Video: California residents prepare for 'the Big One'

All Californians are aware that one day "the Big One" – a massive earthquake – will hit the San Francisco Bay area. According to experts, there is a 90 percent probability that...

Read more