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Italy helps integrate asylum seekers through training

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'It's a jungle': Living on the street in the City of Light

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THE DEBATE

Boko Haram Kidnappings: Can Nigerian schoolgirls be protected?

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PEOPLE & PROFIT

Brand Trump: Has the US president damaged his company's reputation?

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Oscars sneak peek: 'Call Me By Your Name', 'I, Tonya' and 'Darkest Hour'

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Are the French rude, or is it a big misunderstanding?

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Gun control in the US: A glimmer of compromise?

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Opposition activist Evan Mawarire: Zimbabweans hope they can 'reset our future'

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IN THE PRESS

Donald Trump's cheat sheet

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ACCESS ASIA

Exclusive reports, features and analysis on political and social events from across the Asian continent. Every Monday at 5.45 pm Paris time.

Latest update : 2018-01-22

Why Hong Kong produces 200,000 tons of electronic waste per year

Where do your computers, tablets and smartphones go to die? Electronic waste is an environmental problem throughout Asia, but nowhere more so than in Hong Kong. For a long time the city was only a stepping stone before the waste went to mainland China. But since 2015, the Chinese authorities have banned its import and containers remain docked. Clandestine landfills are now popping up in Hong Kong. Our correspondents Antoine Védéilhé, Vivien Wong and Sarah O'Meara report on the consequences.

Meanwhile, in central Pakistan, DNA tests have confirmed that the same person carried out the rapes and murders of six children in the city of Kasur. Concerns that a serial killer is on the loose have prompted soul-searching over whether the country fails to protect the most vulnerable. It was only in 2016 that Pakistan criminalised child abuse.

Over in China, a photograph of an eight-year-old boy with icicles in his hair made waves in the country and around the world, becoming a symbol of those impoverished and left behind by the country's economic boom. We tell you more about Fuman Wang, the Ice Boy of China.

Finally, South Korea is putting its money where its mouth is. After saying it wants to become the epicentre of winter sports in Asia, the country has invested $800 million on new facilities ahead of hosting the Winter Olympics. But judging from the country's own track record, some facilities run the risk of being neglected or abandoned in the future.

By William HILDERBRANDT , Stéphane BERNSTEIN , Anne POUZARGUES

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Archives

2018-02-19 North Korea

Korea's divided families: Hopes for a reunion after decades apart

The freezing temperatures at the Winter Olympics in South Korea couldn't stop a thaw in relations with the North. But what will it mean beyond the Games? Thousands of families...

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2018-02-05 China

China's 'Great Green Wall': Country battles large-scale desertification

Decades ago, China began building a so-called "Great Green Wall" to halt desertification. Despite this, some 3,000 square kilometres of land are lost every year, ravaging...

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2018-01-13 unemployment

Fighting unemployment: Millions of Indians face layoffs amid shrinking job market

For several years now, India has been selling its wares as one of Asia's biggest economies. But despite the government's claims that things are getting rosier, there's been no...

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2017-12-18 Funeral

Japan offers world's first drive-through funerals

In Japan, paying your final respects to your nearest and dearest needn't be a long, drawn-out affair. You can now bid your last farewells to loved ones without ever unbuckling...

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