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MEDIAWATCH

Macron makes Time 100 as France revolts

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THE DEBATE

Turkey's rush to the polls: Erdogan calls snap election to cement his power

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THE POLITICAL BRIEF

France's Macron likens divisions within EU to 'civil war'

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ENCORE!

Sting and Shaggy on making musical magic together

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FOCUS

The citizens finding solutions to Lebanon's chronic waste crisis

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THE INTERVIEW

Head of UN entity probing war crimes in Syria speaks to FRANCE 24

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PEOPLE & PROFIT

The future of work: How the gig economy is changing the jobs market

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PERSPECTIVE

'France has underinvested in early childhood education for many years'

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IN THE PRESS

'Badass': Accolades pour in for Southwest pilot who landed plane after engine failure

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ACCESS ASIA

Exclusive reports, features and analysis on political and social events from across the Asian continent. Every Monday at 5.45 pm Paris time.

Latest update : 2018-01-22

Why Hong Kong produces 200,000 tons of electronic waste per year

Where do your computers, tablets and smartphones go to die? Electronic waste is an environmental problem throughout Asia, but nowhere more so than in Hong Kong. For a long time the city was only a stepping stone before the waste went to mainland China. But since 2015, the Chinese authorities have banned its import and containers remain docked. Clandestine landfills are now popping up in Hong Kong. Our correspondents Antoine Védéilhé, Vivien Wong and Sarah O'Meara report on the consequences.

Meanwhile, in central Pakistan, DNA tests have confirmed that the same person carried out the rapes and murders of six children in the city of Kasur. Concerns that a serial killer is on the loose have prompted soul-searching over whether the country fails to protect the most vulnerable. It was only in 2016 that Pakistan criminalised child abuse.

Over in China, a photograph of an eight-year-old boy with icicles in his hair made waves in the country and around the world, becoming a symbol of those impoverished and left behind by the country's economic boom. We tell you more about Fuman Wang, the Ice Boy of China.

Finally, South Korea is putting its money where its mouth is. After saying it wants to become the epicentre of winter sports in Asia, the country has invested $800 million on new facilities ahead of hosting the Winter Olympics. But judging from the country's own track record, some facilities run the risk of being neglected or abandoned in the future.

By William HILDERBRANDT , Stéphane BERNSTEIN , Anne POUZARGUES

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Archives

2018-04-16 Myanmar

Myanmar builds over destroyed Rohingya villages

In Myanmar's Rakhine state, military and local officials are building over the area where 700,000 Rohingya were forced to leave their homes behind. The stateless Muslim minority...

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2018-04-02 cricket

Australian cricket under mounting scrutiny amid ball-tampering scandal

In Australia, cricket is reeling from a ball-tampering crisis. Skipper Steve Smith and senior batsman David Warner have been banned from the sport for 12 months. The scandal has...

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2018-03-19 India

India's missing women: The dark legacy of sex selection

In India, officials say the population is missing more than 60 million women, equivalent to the entire population of the UK. It's the result of a decades-old preference in India...

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2018-03-05 Maldives

Trouble in paradise: Political crisis deepens in Maldives

The Maldives may be best known for its white beaches, but recently the nation's been engulfed by political turmoil. The president declared a state of emergency last month,...

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2018-02-19 North Korea

Korea's divided families: Hopes for a reunion after decades apart

The freezing temperatures at the Winter Olympics in South Korea couldn't stop a thaw in relations with the North. But what will it mean beyond the Games? Thousands of families...

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