Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

EYE ON AFRICA

Tens of thousands bid farewell to Morgan Tsvangirai

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Afrin: 'a war without images'

Read more

THE DEBATE

Syria on the Brink: Can Assad help the Kurds against Turkish forces?

Read more

FOCUS

Inside the murky business of cobalt mining in DR Congo

Read more

ENCORE!

100% Pure Parisian: Comedian Julie Collas helps locals laugh at themselves

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Chinese textile wholesalers open Marseille site

Read more

IN THE PRESS

Meet Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer: Angela Merkel's 'mini-me'

Read more

IN THE PRESS

Major French student union rocked by sexual assault claims

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Photographer Pete Souza shares his ‘portrait’ of Obama

Read more

Davos: top quotes so far

© AFP | Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi channelled Mohandas Gandhi by saying 'I will not accept my feet to be uprooted by these winds'

DAVOS (SWITZERLAND) (AFP) - 

After days of heavy snowfall, the World Economic Forum opened for a full day of business in the ritzy ski resort of Davos.

Here is a taste of some crunchy quotes from the global gathering so far:

"I want that the winds of cultures of all countries to enter my house with aplomb and go out also. However, I will not accept my feet to be uprooted by these winds." -- Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the forum's opening day headliner, channelling his country's founding father, Mohandas Gandhi.

"My hope is that we can collectively demonstrate that even without testosterone we can actually produce a positive, constructive energy to deliver solutions. That's my goal." -- International Monetary Fund (IMF) chief Christine Lagarde, who co-heads this year's conference with seven other women. The WEF continues to struggle to get much above 20 percent of female participants.

"Who knows what he's going to say. He could be deeply charming. He could be very aggressive, and I suspect aggressive because that's why he's coming here." -- Richard Edelman, CEO of Edelman, a major PR firm, speaking as anticipation grows for the visit by Donald Trump on Thursday.

"I've learned over time not to bet against the US economy. It's not a winning strategy." -- Credit Suisse CEO Tidjane Thiam, cautioning against pessimism, even amid doubts over the policies of the Trump administration.

"No other event has quite such a global appeal," -- Andy Christie, director for executive jets at Air Charter Service, a private plane firm, who said last year's conference logged more than 1,000 private jet flights over the event's five days.

"We do have to be careful about representing a rating (of an Uber driver) for what it is. It is a rating for how you drove, it's not a rating for if you are a serial killer or not." -- Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, telling a panel that his company can hardly be expected to anticipate all the unexpected dangers that come with shared riding.

"My favourite part about a book is the smell of it. There's something about it. It defines who you are. I hate (technology), social media, all of it. It does nothing for me at all." -- Los Angeles-based artist Mike Stilkey, one of 40 'cultural leaders' invited by the WEF, going against the hi-tech grain that dominates the conference. Exhibited at the main conference centre, his eight-metre-tall installation is painted on the spine of 8,000 disused books.

© 2018 AFP