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EYE ON AFRICA

Burundi approves new constitution allowing president to extend time in power

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THE DEBATE

Populist takeover: Italy approves unprecedented coalition

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FOCUS

Young Nicaraguans lead protests against President Ortega

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ENCORE!

Music show: Opera singer Lawrence Brownlee, Snow Patrol & Natalie Prass

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TALKING EUROPE

EU Commissioner Johannes Hahn: 'Either we import stability, or we export instability'

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TALKING EUROPE

From Italy to Cyprus via Hungary: A look back at key events in Europe

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BUSINESS DAILY

US-China trade war is 'on hold'

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#TECH 24

Is GDPR a good thing for EU tech companies?

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PERSPECTIVE

'The internet is like water, we need to help children understand how to swim'

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DOWN TO EARTH

We meet the people behind fascinating environmental, health and technological innovations in a bid for sustainable solutions to our changing world. Saturday at 7.20 pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2018-02-02

Could Bitcoin cost us our clean energy future?

Gone are the days when it was just a currency for geeks. 2017 was without a doubt the year of the ubiquitous Bitcoin. In the past year, investors have flocked to the highly volatile currency seeking to make a fortune. It's attractive for several reasons: Bitcoin requires no central bank and is directly and anonymously traded from person to person. But its surge in popularity could have a real impact on the environment. We take a closer look.

While it’s a virtual currency, Bitcoin requires real energy, and lots of it. Today, each transaction requires the same amount of electricity used to power at least four homes in the United States for one day. Could Bitcoin end up being a threat to our planet? Join us as we explore why the currency is so energy-hungry.

By Florence VILLEMINOT , Marina BERTSCH , Valérie DEKIMPE , Sonia BARITELLO

Archives

2018-05-18 environment

Could thawing permafrost unleash long-gone deadly viruses?

In the remote town of Longyearbyen, in Norway’s Arctic region, the ground is permanently frozen. As temperatures rise, the thawing permafrost could open a Pandora's box, with...

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2018-05-04 pollution

Will cleaner air accelerate global warming?

It's probably part of your daily life, even if you don’t notice it. And yet, it kills an estimated seven million people each year. Around the world, countries are waking up and...

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2018-04-17 agriculture

Can France bid 'adieu' to popular weedkiller glyphosate?

France is Europe's top agricultural producer and also its top consumer of glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in history. Each year, nearly 8,000 tons of it are used in...

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2018-04-03 climate change

Can the courtroom save the planet?

The planet may have found its newest and perhaps greatest ally: the law. In the past three years, the number of climate-related lawsuits across the world has tripled. In 2017,...

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2018-03-20 Germany

German villages sacrificed in the name of coal

In Germany, one of Europe’s largest coal mines is gaining ground, destroying dozens of villages in its path. Some 35,000 people have already been relocated and 24 new villages...

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