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INSIDE THE AMERICAS

Indigenous peoples: Fighting discrimination

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MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

From Turkey to Iran: (re)inventing kebab

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THE INTERVIEW

Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara: ‘Dinosaurs were the last great champions’

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THE INTERVIEW

Alan Turing's nephew: ‘A Shakespearean tragedy surrounded his life’

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EYE ON AFRICA

Zimbabwe: Chamisa's lawyers contest election results in court

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THE WORLD THIS WEEK

New US sanctions on Iran: Trump ups pressure after exiting nuclear deal

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IN THE PRESS

‘Space Farce’? Alternative logos for new US military branch flood social media

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EYE ON AFRICA

Zambia accused of illegal handover of Zimbabwean opposition figure

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MEDIAWATCH

#MyCameraIsMyWeapon campaign takes on Iran's mandatory hijab law

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DOWN TO EARTH

We meet the people behind fascinating environmental, health and technological innovations in a bid for sustainable solutions to our changing world. Saturday at 7.20 pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2018-02-02

Could Bitcoin cost us our clean energy future?

Gone are the days when it was just a currency for geeks. 2017 was without a doubt the year of the ubiquitous Bitcoin. In the past year, investors have flocked to the highly volatile currency seeking to make a fortune. It's attractive for several reasons: Bitcoin requires no central bank and is directly and anonymously traded from person to person. But its surge in popularity could have a real impact on the environment. We take a closer look.

While it’s a virtual currency, Bitcoin requires real energy, and lots of it. Today, each transaction requires the same amount of electricity used to power at least four homes in the United States for one day. Could Bitcoin end up being a threat to our planet? Join us as we explore why the currency is so energy-hungry.

By Florence VILLEMINOT , Marina BERTSCH , Valérie DEKIMPE , Sonia BARITELLO

Archives

2018-07-13 Molly HALL

Portugal: Eucalyptus trees under fire

Join us on Down To Earth as we return to the scene of Portugal's deadliest wildfires. Last year, 115 people were killed and 500,000 hectares of land scorched. The poor emergency...

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2018-06-29 Molly HALL

Menstruation: Green is the new red

Menstruation is a natural part of every woman's life. The average woman will use some 10,000 single-use pads and tampons in her lifetime. They may be disposable, but they’re not...

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2018-06-15 Molly HALL

Iran's water crisis

It's an environmental issue that's become a thorny political problem. Iran has been experiencing severe drought for several years. A growing population, increased water...

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2018-06-01 Marina BERTSCH

France’s disappearing birds

Across France, fields have gone quiet… In 20 years, one-third of the country’s birds have disappeared. Meadow Pipits and Partridges have nearly been wiped out. It’s a...

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2018-05-18 Florence VILLEMINOT

Could thawing permafrost unleash long-gone deadly viruses?

In the remote town of Longyearbyen, in Norway’s Arctic region, the ground is permanently frozen. As temperatures rise, the thawing permafrost could open a Pandora's box, with...

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