Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

EYE ON AFRICA

New high speed railway threatens Kenyan wildlife

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Senegalese court convicts 13 people in country's first mass terrorism trial

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Macron's bodyguard scandal grows

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Trump invites Putin to Washington, France celebrates the World Cup, Macron's first scandal, Nicaragua's crackdown

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

A closer look at France's World Cup victory

Read more

ENCORE!

I want your sax: France's love affair with jazz

Read more

REPORTERS

Video: Maracaibo, the story of Venezuela's collapse

Read more

FOCUS

Knife crime on the rise in London

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Nicaraguans 'betrayed' by Ortega, says Bianca Jagger

Read more

Europe

Researchers sound alarm over 'catastrophic' drop in French bird populations

© Philippe Huguen, AFP | A starling in Godewaersvelde on March 21. France’s bird populations have collapsed by a third over the last decade and a half, alarmed researchers reported on March 20.

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2018-03-21

Bird populations across an eerily quiet French countryside have collapsed, on average, by a third over the last decade-and-a-half, alarmed researchers reported on Tuesday.

Dozens of species have seen their numbers decline, in some cases by two-thirds, the scientists detailed in a pair of studies, one national in scope and the other covering a large agricultural region in central France.

"The situation is catastrophic," said Benoit Fontaine, a conservation biologist at France's National Museum of Natural History and co-author of one of the studies.

"Our countryside is in the process of become a veritable desert," he said in a communique released by the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), which also contributed to the findings.

The common white throat, the ortolan bunting, the Eurasian skylark and other once-ubiquitous species have all fallen off by at least a third, according to a detailed, annual census initiated at the start of the century.

A migratory song bird, the meadow pipit, has declined by nearly 70 percent.

'Hardly any insects left'

The culprit, researchers speculate, is the intensive use of pesticides on vast tracts of monoculture crops, especially wheat and corn.

The problem is not that birds are being poisoned, but that the insects on which they depend for food have disappeared.

"There are hardly any insects left, that's the number one problem," said Vincent Bretagnolle, a CNRS ecologist at the Centre for Biological Studies in Chize.

Recent research, he noted, has uncovered similar trends across Europe, estimating that flying insects have declined by 80 percent, and bird populations have dropped by more than 400 million in 30 years.

In France, data crossed from the two studies -- one national, one regional -- also suggested industrial-scale agriculture was to blame.

"What is really alarming, is that all the birds in an agricultural setting are declining at the same speed, even 'generalist' birds," which also thrive in other settings such as wooded areas, said Bretagnolle.

"That shows that the overall quality of the agricultural ecosystem is deteriorating."

Figures from the national survey -- which relies on a network of hundreds of volunteer ornithologists -- indicate that the overall decline intensified in 2016 and 2017.

(AFP)

Date created : 2018-03-21

  • ENVIRONMENT

    Wildlife populations plummeted nearly 60 percent since 1970, says WWF

    Read more

  • FRANCE

    Graphic videos spark calls for greater oversight of French slaughterhouses

    Read more

  • USA

    'Annihilation' of earth's species is occurring globally, scientists warn

    Read more

COMMENT(S)