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'Truth or Fake': How to spot fake images online

© FRANCE 24

Text by Gaëlle FAURE , Derek THOMSON

Latest update : 2018-03-22

Do you think before you share? When you see an amazing video online, do you verify it before sending it on to your friends? Maybe you should.

Fake news comes from many sources: “clickbait” sites that will say anything to get ad revenue, well-funded “troll farms”, shadowy groups mobilising for political candidates on the other side of the world. But when something shows up in your newsfeed, you’re the one who makes the choice. If you share something that is false, you are participating in the spread of fake news.

FRANCE 24 has produced a short programme, “Truth or Fake”, designed for middle schools and high schools (children aged 14 to 18). The idea is to show them examples of photos and videos online that have been manipulated or taken out of context. In each case, we explain how the image was faked, and what tools and techniques we used to detect it. Tools like Google Image Search and the InVID plugin are readily available and easy to use – for internet users of all ages.

Common sense can help too. You can learn more by reading the FRANCE 24 Observers Verification Guide.

"Truth or Fake" is the English-language version of “Info ou Intox”, a programme produced by FRANCE 24’s Ségolène Malterre and Wassim Nasr. Starting in 2018, the programme is now produced in French, English, Spanish and Arabic.

Date created : 2018-03-22

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