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Erdogan to rid Turkish institutions of ‘separatist cancer’ after coup attempt

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Going for gold: French athletes train for Rio Olympics

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Women doctors in Pakistan challenge the status quo

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Trump hopes to reset America's trade relations

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'Donald Trump's speech was just another scam'

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Cazeneuve at the heart of Nice security controversy

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South Africa: Prosecutors seek longer sentence for Oscar Pistorius

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Hervé AMORIC

Over 3600 people lost their lives in Northern Ireland during 3 decades of conflict. In the last 10 years, the peace process has taken roots and reconciliation is under way, despite some sporadic violence. On 23 June, over a million NI voters will make their voice heard, choosing for the United Kingdom to stay in the EU, or to leave it. In Northern Ireland, part of the UK, the Brexit referendum campaign has divided the population along the historic political divide. The leaders of the Democratic Unionist Party -- the main representative of the protestant tradition, loyal to the British Crown -- have called for their supporters to vote to leave the EU -- while Sinn Féin, the largest party on the catholic nationalist side - are calling for a vote to remain. Our correspondents Hervé AMORIC and Steve O'REILLY report from North Belfast.SCRIPTThis is the only Park in Europe that's divided by a wall. Catholics, nationalists live on one side, Protestants, loyal to the British Crown, on the other. Liam Maskey runs a cross-community organisation, funded by the EU, promoting reconciliation in an area where a thousand people lost their lives.Liam MASKEY, Founder INTERCOMM (NGO)"This is now a shared building of housing, it consists of 20 odd homes with people both protestant and catholic, republican and loyalist. This could not have happened if it wasn't for Europe and the peace money that Europe gave. If we are no longer part of Europe, if Britain pulls out, where do we go with this?Question: Would the peace process be in danger?Answer: Very very much so." On the mainly protestant side of Alexandra Park is Tiger's Bay. What people here think of the Brexit referendum is written on the walls. Linda MACKINTOSH, shopkeeper"I'm going to vote out…because I think there is too much money going into Europe out of this country".David GILLILAND, Community Development Worker"It's Unionist community, it's likely to be one where, the arguments about bringing control back to Britain probably plays better".On the outskirts of Belfast, this Sinn Féin politician warns against the dangers of new check points, on the UK's only land border with another EU country, the Republic of Ireland.Declan KEARNEY, Sinn Féin chairman, Member of the Legislative Assembly Northern Ireland "That's one of the consequences that would inevitably emerge from a Brexit. We would see a hardening of partition." The British Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is playing down the fears of a Brexit. Theresa VILLIERS, British Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (Conservative) "All these scare stories about how we suddenly are going to return to the control towers and security apparatus of the troubles just lack any credibility. It is just not going to happen. We are going to keep that open border."An enforced border between the two States on this island is a symbol of a past conflict, bitter painful memories that no one will FORGET;Ends

The Brexit debate as seen from Northern Ireland

France 24 takes a look at how the Brexit debate is dividing voters in Northern Ireland along historic political lines.

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2016-06-18 14:04 Jo Cox local reax

Birstall locals pay tribute to Jo Cox

2016-06-18 14:04 Jo Cox local reax

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This London café is home from home for these Syrians. Abdelaziz - a refugee himself - set up a solidarity movement to defend the rights of Syrians and to help them settle here in the UK. Abdelaziz , Syrian Solidarity Movement UK"We have campaigning since the start of the Syrian revolution. But to be fair, nobody seems to care at all. If the international community stopped Assad's massacres against his own people, people would not leave. Syrians decided to come to Europe just like a few months ago, or a year ago."Rateb smuggled himself into Britain from Calais. For a year, he has been seeking Refugee status in order to bring his family over. His wife and 3 children are in a camp on the Syrian border. Rateb AL KANAAN, Syrian Asylum Seeker""Trad. "They don't have any material or moral support, because I am not there with them. I can't tell you how afraid my wife and children are at night. Every second, I miss them". At this meeting of grassroots activists, Abdeluziz is helping to organise a humanitarian convoy to the migrant camps in Calais. He calls upon the British government to do more. Adbelaziz AL MASHI"To take in 20 000 Syrian refugees by 2020 is simply pitiful. It's nothing, this not a response, this is out of touch. Britain is a permanent member of the Security Council, Britain can do more".A pile of rubble outside the House of Commons, to remind European leaders of the human cost of Syria's war. International NGOs also expect more from EU governments. Caroline ANNING, Save The Children, NGO"When we're talking about the refugee crisis in Europe, Europeans have buried their heads in the sand for far too long, we saw a million people come here last year, including a huge number of unaccompanied children. They are really vulnerable and they're not getting the support that they need". These Syrians may be safe in London but their thoughts are with their friends and family, back home in the war zone. Ends

For London's Syrian refugees, 'Britain can do more'

This London café is home from home for these Syrians. Abdelaziz - a refugee himself - set up a solidarity movement to defend the rights of Syrians and to help…

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