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Compromise buys Greece time and Jihadi John is unmasked (part 1)

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The future of agriculture

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Yalta, the symbol of a new Cold War?

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Women in the workforce: IMF says closing the gender gap makes economic sense

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We travel across the globe and meet the people behind the most fascinating environmental, health and technological innovations in a bid for sustainable solutions to our changing world. Every other Sunday at 8.40 pm.

DOWN TO EARTH

DOWN TO EARTH

Latest update : 2015-02-16

Forests worth more alive than dead

We are Down to Earth in Peru on a police patrol to La Pampa, a wasteland on the outskirts of the Amazon. In the last six years 50,000 hectares of rainforest have been obliterated in this region, most of it due to illegal gold mining. Today the authorities are clamping down.

Despite efforts to halt deforestation, the number of trees being cut in Peru has jumped 80% since the start of the century. NGOs such as Rainforest Alliance are working with local communities to prove that protecting the forest - and adding value to existing renewable resources - offers a more lucrative and sustainable income over the long term. Tourism could be the most promising. If visitors are willing to pay large amounts to see unspoiled virgin rainforests, it may be the most powerful evidence that trees in the Amazon are worth more alive than dead.

‘‘Trees are as alive as us but the problem is we don't feel attached to them’’
 
French director Luc Jacquet’s film ‘Once Upon a Forest’ tries to elicit an emotional response in the audience, using animation to convey that trees and humans are surprisingly similar. Scientists, too, are studying how to make people care. At the University of Stanford’s Virtual Human Interaction Laboratory researchers say they’ve found a way to reduce paper consumption by turning participants into virtual tree-cutters.
 
Biotechnology: making it impossible to cheat the system
 
Back in Peru, Dennis del Castillo is an agronomist looking for a global solution to the illegal trafficking of timber. Over the next three years he’ll create a DNA bank of trees eligible for exportation, making it possible to trace the precise origin of wood bound for customers in Europe, the United States or Asia.

By Mairead DUNDAS , Marina BERTSCH , Marie SCHUSTER , Julie DUNGELHOEFF , Alice CAMPAIGNOLLE , Yara JAMALI ELO

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2015-02-15 carbon emissions

Forests worth more alive than dead

We are Down to Earth in Peru on a police patrol to La Pampa, a wasteland on the outskirts of the Amazon. In the last six years 50,000 hectares of rainforest have been obliterated...

Read more

2014-11-16 Mexico

Drought emergency

After one of the driest periods in history, 2014 is on track to be the hottest since records began. How do we adapt to these extreme climate conditions which may be here to stay ?

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2015-01-18 carbon emissions

Hydrogen, fuel of the future?

Is the universe's most abundant element the best alternative to petrol? As Toyota rolls out its first hydrogen fuel cell car, the Down to Earth team explores how this technology...

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2014-10-19 carbon emissions

Climate therapy

Greenhouse gas emissions are rising at the fastest rate in three decades. Meteorologists warn the world is running out of time. In this episode, the Down to Earth team explores...

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