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In the press

“Gaddafi kills Libyan people like he kills sheep”

In today’s international press review, we focus on the crisis in the Arab world, namely Lybia. More than 300 people are feared dead after yesterday’s violence. Security forces opened fire on mourners who attended protesters’ funerals. Although there is a foreign media block out, we were able to read Libyan blogs and eye witness accounts...

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A Libyan woman called Rahma posted on the blog Alive in Libya. She describes her experience in Tripoli, in a suburb called Fashloom.
 
“[...] Fashloom is another suburb where there’s rioting and protesting, anti-government. And because of these riots, the cops as we speak are shooting live ammunition at them and grenades.”
 
In another post, a Libyan living in the US writes: “[Gadaffi] is killing Libyans like he kills sheep.[...] He paid African mercenaries for every person they kill”.
 
The Guardian  andThe Independent talk about a massacre... The Guardian interviewed an opposition writer who warns that Gaddafi will not leave without a bloodshed.
 
Meanwhile in the Arab press, most newspapers seem to agree on the fact that Gaddafi must resign. According to Al Quods Al Arabi, the Libyan leader has no friends in the Arab world. The few friends he might have in the West are not likely to stick around, says the paper.
 
Meanwhile,The Daily Mail talks about a “bloodbath that shames Britain”. The tabloid quotes a legal adviser at the UN High Commission on Human Rights, who says that “Britain might be guilty of complicity in the killings”. According to the paper, British weapons are believed to have been used to murder pro-democracy protesters.
 
In Belgium, Le Soir also wonders if its country was involved in a weapons deal that has back fired against the revolution. That information has not been officially confirmed yet.
 
And finally, cartoonists around the world describe the situation in the Arab World through art.

 

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