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US Supreme Court decision boosts anti-abortion activists in California

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Beginning of the end for 'Mutti'? State election reflects Merkel's unpopularity

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IN THE PRESS

An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

Latest update : 2011-03-16

Japan’s faceless heroes

A group of 50 Japanese workers have decided to stay behind at the Fukushima power plant, in a bid to prevent a massive radiation leak. Workers’ names haven’t been revealed but they are thought to be volunteers, firefighters and police officers. Prepared to risk their lives and face Japan’s worst catastrophe in decades, the workers are seen as heroes.

 

Japan’s neighboring countries are closely monitoring the situation. The nuclear threat is on the front page ofJoongAng Daily (S.Korea), The Moscow Times, theChina Daily, andThe Bangkok Post.
 
Meanwhile, the Wall Street Journal (Asia) focuses on life in Iwaki, a city located just outside the 20km evacuation zone, on the coast of Northeastern Japan.
The New York Times reports about the “faceless 50”, ready to sacrifice themselves for the good of the country. 
 
The Independent notes that the health of those workers will determine the seriousness of the leak. The more ill they get, the higher the radiation levels...
 
Five days after the earthquake and the tsunami, the death toll keeps rising. According toThe Guardian, local authorities are considering mass burials as opposed to traditional cremations.
 
And finally, a sign of hope published in The Daily Mirror.

 

By Aurore Cloe DUPUIS

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Archives

2018-10-16 In the papers

Blind support or strategic move? Australia mulls embassy move to Jerusalem

IN THE PAPERS - Tuesday, October 16: A year ago, high-profile Maltese journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia was assassinated. Her family condemns the fact that her killers have not...

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2018-10-15 In the papers

Beginning of the end for 'Mutti'? State election reflects Merkel's unpopularity

IN THE PAPERS - Monday, October 15: Angela Merkel's coalition partner gets a drubbing in state elections in Bavaria. What does it mean for the federal government? Also, in his...

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2018-10-12 In the papers

'Mbappésque': The Life and TIME of Kylian Mbappé

IN THE PAPERS - Friday, October 12 2018: In the past year, French football star Kylian Mbappé has become a world-renowned star. The 19-year-old is not only gracing the cover of...

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2018-10-11 In the papers

World of wine tasting uncorked by cheating scandal

IN THE PAPERS - Thursday, October 11: Germany's state of Bavaria gears up for an election this weekend that could impact Angela Merkel's chancellorship. The French-speaking...

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2018-10-10 In the papers

#MeToo: A year later, movement finally reaches India, engulfs high-profile men

IN THE PAPERS - Wednesday, October 10: It's World Mental Health Day and British PM Theresa May has appointed the world's first ever minister dedicated to suicide prevention....

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