Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE INTERVIEW

France's Macron calls disappearance of Saudi journalist 'very serious'

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Dozens killed in Eastern Uganda mudslide

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Royal wedding fatigue?

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Rwanda’s Kagame: Macron has brought ‘freshness’ to world politics

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The backlash over Khashoggi: Pressure mounts over disappearance of Saudi journalist

Read more

YOU ARE HERE

The Piton de la Fournaise volcano: Sparks fly on France’s Reunion Island

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

Animal welfare: France at the bottom of the class

Read more

#TECH 24

An AI version of yourself to help you think

Read more

DOWN TO EARTH

Can citizen action stop climate change?

Read more

REPORTERS

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2015-03-19

Tunisians flock to join jihad

© France 24

As Tunisia moves slowly forward on the path to democracy, the country is proportionally one of the biggest exporters of jihadist fighters. Over the past three years thousands of young Tunisians are believed to have joined Islamist groups in Syria and Iraq. Why are so many Tunisians flocking to jihad, and how can the trend be stopped?

For almost a year we have been investigating why so many Tunisians are drawn to jihad and how they get into the warzones of Syria and Iraq.

Over several months we have tried to meet those who traveled to join the war in Syria and who have come back. What struck us most was the strength of their conviction and the diversity of their backgrounds. Some are engineers or doctors – in Tunisia, the phenomenon cuts across social classes. Most of these young people were students or had held jobs.

Some of them agreed to speak to us, but it was difficult to convince them to appear on camera. We won the trust of some of their families and we met one young Tunisian jihadist who went to Syria and agreed to speak about his experiences.

By Hamdi TLILI , Laurent GAILLARDON , Marine CASALIS

Archives

2018-10-12 Reporters

Reporters: No way home for the Rohingya

Since August 2017, nearly a million Rohingya Muslims have fled a brutal crackdown by the Burmese army. Today, they live in the world’s largest refugee camp in neighbouring...

Read more

2018-10-05 Reporters

Reporters: Living in fear of the militias in Rio

In Rio de Janeiro, dozens of neighbourhoods and favelas are under the control of militias. All of them use terror to control locals and businesses, and resisting them can be...

Read more

2018-02-09 Reporters

Reporters: The ‘missing’ that China keeps silent

Chinese authorities go to great lengths to control society, with forced disappearances becoming the norm. Since President Xi Jinping came to power in 2013, political opponents...

Read more

2018-09-28 Reporters

Reporters: Kailash Satyarthi is on a mission to end child slavery in India

A child disappears every eight minutes in India. In the capital New Delhi, six out of 10 children who go missing are never found. They are called the "lost generation": More than...

Read more

2018-09-21 Reporters

Colombia: Cursed by coca in Catatumbo

While the United Nations on Wednesday announced that Colombia remains the world’s largest cocaine producer, our reporters visited the northeastern region of Catatumbo - one of...

Read more