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THE DEBATE

Saudi Arabia under pressure: Crown Prince defiant over Khashoggi disappearance

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THE OBSERVERS

Biking in Cuba, entrepreneurship in Burundi, and more

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ENCORE!

Music show: NOLA French Connection Brass Band, Yoko Ono & Neneh Cherry

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FOCUS

US Supreme Court decision boosts anti-abortion activists in California

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IN THE PRESS

Beginning of the end for 'Mutti'? State election reflects Merkel's unpopularity

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TALKING EUROPE

Spain's Europe minister rules out new Catalan independence referendum

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TALKING EUROPE

Hungary's Orban: What consequences of symbolic EU vote?

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THE INTERVIEW

South Sudan: How it won the longest war but lost the peace

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REVISITED

We return to places which have been in the news - often a long time ago, sometimes recently - to see how local people are rebuilding their lives. Sunday at 9.10 pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2016-03-25

Video: What remains of the utopia of Brasilia?

In the 1950s, those who designed and built the man-made capital of Brasilia had dreamed of a city capable of offering a better life to its people. What remains of these ideals? Built for 500,000 inhabitants, it is now home to three million. Brasilia is bursting at the seams and is now the capital of a country shaken by social change and a deep crisis of confidence in its political class.

Built in just a thousand days, Brasilia was the brainchild of President Juscelino Kubitschek. The city was supposed to attract economic development to the centre of the country, far from the coastal cities of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo.

But more than that, Brasilia represented a new social order, a socialist political project based on egalitarian ideas. A utopia which would give access to housing, job creation, a good standard of living and social integration. The towering monuments of architect Oscar Niemeyer have divided opinion. Brasilia gives a whole new meaning to modernity.

Today, the capital is growing three times faster than any other city in Brazil. It was originally designed for 500,000 people. By 2030 the population is expected to reach 5.6 million, 15 times more than that originally envisaged by urban planner Lucio Costa. What remains today of the values and egalitarian vision of its builders?

By Marlène HABERARD , Nicolas RANSOM , Thadeu PRADO

Archives

2018-10-05 REVISITED

Baghdad Revisited: The resilience of the Iraqi people

"The abode of peace and capital of Islam" – this is how 14th century explorer Ibn Battuta described Baghdad in his writings. The city’s recent history, however, has been anything...

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2018-09-21 REVISITED

Video: Hero or dictator? Ugandans divided over Idi Amin Dada’s legacy

Forty years after Idi Amin Dada’s bloody regime came to an end, Ugandans are divided over how to view their former leader. For older Ugandans, the president’s eight years at the...

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2018-09-07 REVISITED

Video: One year after Hurricane Irma, St Martin struggles to recover

On September 5, 2017, Hurricane Irma – the most powerful the Caribbean has ever seen – hit Saint-Martin, the small island France shares with the Netherlands. At least 11 people...

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2018-08-24 REVISITED

Is Iceland's economic miracle a social model for Europe?

Our reporters returned to Iceland, some 10 years after the tiny island nation plunged into a deep crisis after the country’s banking system collapsed like a house of cards....

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2018-06-22 REVISITED

Video: Shenzhen, from fishing port to China’s Silicon Valley

As French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe begins a four-day visit to China in the south-eastern city of Shenzhen, our team reports from this former fishing village that’s been...

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