Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

EYE ON AFRICA

Ethiopia violence: 1200 detained after Addis Ababa clashes

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Macron's former bodyguard's gun selfie

Read more

THE DEBATE

Which world order? Trump, Macron spell out rival visions at U.N.

Read more

ENCORE!

Debra Granik: 'There aren't many women who love making films about blood and gore'

Read more

IN THE PRESS

Medical breakthrough? Researchers find way to tackle Alzheimer's

Read more

FOCUS

Jihadists, but no terror attacks: The case of Italy

Read more

THE OBSERVERS

A controversial pastor in Haiti, pollution in Casablanca, and more

Read more

PERSPECTIVE

Photojournalist Reza: 'Children are now the best photographers'

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Instagram founders quit photo app

Read more

Technology

Video: Mars ‘explorers’ emerge from year-long space simulation

© University of Hawai‘i News | Crew members exit from their Mars simulation habitat on slopes of Mauna Loa mountain on August 28, 2016

Video by FRANCE 2

Text by FRANCE 24

Latest update : 2016-08-29

Six scientists have completed a year-long experiment in Hawaii, where they were tasked with simulating everyday life for a crew on a virtual space mission to the planet Mars.

The participants emerged from a dome on the slopes of Mauna Loa mountain after being subject to isolation for 365 days as part of the Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, or HI-SEAS.

During that time they could go outside only while wearing spacesuits.

Cyprien Verseux, a crew member from France, said the simulation shows that a mission to Mars can succeed.

"I can give you my personal impression, which is that a mission to Mars in the close future is realistic. I think the technological and psychological obstacles can be overcome," Verseux said.

Click on the player above to watch the full video report on the HI-SEAS simulation.

Date created : 2016-08-29

  • SCIENCE

    Scientists discover Earth-like planet circling star nearest to Sun

    Read more

  • SCIENCE

    NASA's Juno spacecraft begins Jupiter orbit after five-year voyage

    Read more

COMMENT(S)