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India's #MeToo moment: why women are now calling out sexual harassment

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Objective 'Zero Hunger' 2030: Lambert Wilson and UN's FAO tell us how

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Bosnians help out as migrants pour in

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Saudi Arabia and Donald Trump: How deep do business ties run?

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A pretty picture: Investing in the booming contemporary art market

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US backs off branding China a currency manipulator

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'No free press in Arab world': Washington Post publishes Khashoggi's last column

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Gay couple speak out on surrogacy: 'It's not about exploiting someone'

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EYE ON AFRICA

All the news from Africa and the Maghreb, with France 24’s correspondents and our guests on set. From Monday to Friday at 9.45 pm and 10.45 pm Paris time.

Latest update : 2017-09-15

Zuma's lawyers say 2009 decision to drop charges against him was irrational

In tonight's edition: President Jacob Zuma's lawyers say a 2009 decision to drop charges against him was irrational; Tunisia scraps a decades-old ban on Muslim women marrying non-Muslims; and in Mali, there are growing concerns about the sale of a group of privately-managed schools to an education foundation run by the Turkish government.

In a shock move, lawyers for President Jacob Zuma agree that a decision back in 2009 to drop 800 corruption charges against the South African leader was irrational. It appears they've abandoned efforts to fight prosecution being restarted.

Also, Tunisia scraps a decades-old ban on Muslim women marrying non-Muslims. The move's been welcomed by activists as an important step in tackling sexual discrimination in the country as the interfaith restriction did not apply to Muslim men wanting to marry outside of their faith.

And in Mali, there are growing concerns about the sale of a group of privately-managed schools to an education foundation run by the Turkish government. The institutions had previously belonged to a movement accused of trying to stage a coup last year.

By Mary COLOMBEL , Georja CALVIN-SMITH

Archives

2018-10-17 EYE ON AFRICA

Global competitiveness report ranks African countries

The World Economic Forum has released its competitiveness report for this year and African countries have a long way to go. The top-ranked is Mauritius at 49 and Chad is right at...

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2018-10-17 EYE ON AFRICA

South African musician Bongeziwe Mabandla on his 'urban African folk'

In tonight's edition: President Alassane Ouattara's ruling party clinches victory in municipal polls in Ivory Coast. Also, in Burkina Faso, Yacouba Sawadogo has spent more than...

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2018-10-12 EYE ON AFRICA

Dozens killed in eastern Uganda mudslides

Dozens die in eastern Uganda, where landslides triggered by torrential rains have wreaked havoc on villages and infrastructure. The death toll could yet rise. Also, the...

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2018-10-11 EYE ON AFRICA

Fake 'Transparency International observers' reported during Cameroon election

There are calls for Cameroon's presidential election to be annulled as a scandal over apparently bogus election observers deepens. Also, police in Tanzania hunt two white...

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2018-10-10 EYE ON AFRICA

Kenya bus crash kills at least 50

At least 55 people are killed in a bus crash in western Kenya. Police suspect the driver lost control of the vehicle. Also, a month after a thawing in relations between Ethiopia...

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