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A Pulitzer Prize-winning 'Trajectory': Richard Russo on writing small town America

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Hacking the body, and the mind: The future of connected humanity

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Colombia: Cursed by coca in Catatumbo

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Britain’s Labour Party: No home for Jews?

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Outfoxed: The mystery of the ‘Croydon Cat Killer’

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Backstage at the Moulin Rouge

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Video: Hero or dictator? Ugandans divided over Idi Amin Dada’s legacy

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Sobel Aziz Ngom: Mentoring the next generation of African leaders and entrepreneurs

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EYE ON AFRICA

Uganda's Bobi Wine returns home

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REVISITED

We return to places which have been in the news - often a long time ago, sometimes recently - to see how local people are rebuilding their lives. Sunday at 9.10 pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2017-12-08

Video: Tahrir Square, a melting pot for Egyptian revolutions

Egypt’s Tahrir Square is emblematic of the Arab Spring uprising. In January 2011, thousands of Egyptians thronged onto the Cairo square to protest society-wide corruption and police brutality. Today, and despite the country’s financial crisis, some Arab Spring participants still converge there in a bid to relay their revolutionary ideas to new generations...

In Cairo, there is not a single person who hasn’t heard of Tahrir Square. It all began on Jan. 25, 2011, when several thousand Egyptians gathered there to protest police brutality. What had initially been planned as one day of rallying turned into three weeks of protests - not to mention the “million-man march” - which would bring anti-government activists together not only in Cairo, but all over Egypt.

The protesters would pay a steep price, however: during their 18 days of protests, more than 850 people were killed, and 6,000 people were injured. But on Feb. 11, 2011, they finally achieved what they no longer thought possible: President Hosni Mubarak stepped down after more than 30 years in power.

Two-and-a-half years went by, and the calm slowly seemed to be returning to the square. The army had been put in charge of handling the transition process and the Islamist Mohammed Morsi was democratically elected president. But in June 2013, Morsi’s supporters and critics began a month-long stand-off on the square, and in July Morsi was finally removed from power. General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi was elected president one year later, and has since ruled Egypt with an iron first.

Although the 2011 revolution might seem like a long time ago, some of those who made it happen still try to keep the revolutionary spirit of Tahrir Square alive, despite the repression they face in doing so. Our reporters, Nadia Bléty, Éric de Lavarène and Claire Williot went to meet them.

By Nadia BLETRY , Eric DE LAVARÈNE , Claire WILLIOT

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2018-09-21 REVISITED

Video: Hero or dictator? Ugandans divided over Idi Amin Dada’s legacy

Forty years after Idi Amin Dada’s bloody regime came to an end, Ugandans are divided over how to view their former leader. For older Ugandans, the president’s eight years at the...

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2018-09-07 REVISITED

Video: One year after Hurricane Irma, St Martin struggles to recover

On September 5, 2017, Hurricane Irma – the most powerful the Caribbean has ever seen – hit Saint-Martin, the small island France shares with the Netherlands. At least 11 people...

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2018-08-24 REVISITED

Is Iceland's economic miracle a social model for Europe?

Our reporters returned to Iceland, some 10 years after the tiny island nation plunged into a deep crisis after the country’s banking system collapsed like a house of cards....

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2018-06-22 REVISITED

Video: Shenzhen, from fishing port to China’s Silicon Valley

As French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe begins a four-day visit to China in the south-eastern city of Shenzhen, our team reports from this former fishing village that’s been...

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2018-06-08 REVISITED

Video: What remains of multicultural France that won 1998 World Cup?

Most French people remember where they were on the night of July 12, 1998. That’s when France was crowned the winner of the football World Cup, after beating Brazil 3-0. After...

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