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Mexico's seaweed invasion: Disaster or opportunity?

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Iwao Hakamada, the Japanese boxer still fighting... for his life

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Should supermodels' catwalk strut be protected by copyright?

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Child development: Inside a child's incredible brain

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MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Political and social events from the Middle East, with exclusive reports and interviews. Tuesday at 5.45 pm Paris time.

Latest update : 2017-12-13

'Looking for Oum Kulthum': Breaking the glass ceiling in the art world

If you're familiar with Iranian artists, you'll know the name Shirin Neshat. Her "Women of Allah" photographs catapulted the New Yorker to international acclaim in the 1990s. She has since displayed her work at the Met, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Serpentine Gallery. This time, she's returned with a film within a film - about Egyptian diva Oum Kulthum, who became an icon of female emancipation in the region. Shirin Neshat joins us from New York.

Meanwhile, protests have been flaring across the region after the US president's formal recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Donald Trump announced last week he will be moving the US embassy to the contested city, which is holy to Muslims, Jews and Christians. The decision has reversed decades of US policy, drawing criticism from global leaders, as well as warnings of potential damage to prospects for Middle East peace.

And in Iraq, the Islamic State group may be gone, but reconstruction will be a long and complicated process. We take a look at the city of Baiji, which was once a bustling industrial hub, but which has suffered the worst destruction after that of western Mosul.

By Tamara PAVAN , Rebecca MARTIN , Anne POUZARGUES , Sanam SHANTYAEI

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2018-09-12 MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

War in Syria: Hezbollah's secret soldiers

Since it began seven years ago, Syria's civil conflict has drawn in multiple foreign powers. Among them are Lebanon's Iran-backed Hezbollah forces, who have helped prop up the...

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2018-09-05 MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Yemen in crisis: More than 22 million people in need of humanitarian aid

It's been dubbed the forgotten war, and today multiple factions are entangled in Yemen's ongoing conflict. For three years, a Saudi-led coalition of Arab states have been...

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2018-08-29 MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Tortured Syrian cartoonist haunted by detention

Syrian artist Najah Albukai was held twice in the country's notorious detention centres, where he was tortured. His memories of war have become his art. Today, he's determined to...

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2018-08-23 MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Mosul girls learn to swim a year after city’s liberation from IS group

It's been just over a year since the Iraqi city of Mosul was liberated from the Islamic State group. Some 870,000 people have since returned to their hometown in a bid to rebuild...

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2018-08-14 MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

From Turkey to Iran: (re)inventing kebab

In this special edition, we bring you all things kebab, a dish that dates back some 790,000 years. And when it comes to the region where it has its roots, there is a moutwatering...

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