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Daughter Dylan says telling 'truth' about Woody Allen

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New York (AFP)

Legendary film director Woody Allen was thrust back into the spotlight Wednesday when his estranged daughter Dylan Farrow revived child molestation allegations against him, asking the world to finally believe her.

The 32-year-old's allegations first surfaced in 1992 after Allen left her adoptive mother, the actress and activist Mia Farrow, for Soon-Yi Previn -- the adopted daughter of Mia Farrow and her second husband, Andre Previn.

Allen has always denied the allegations, which were never proven, and the 82-year-old director has continued to enjoy a glittering career.

But the sexual harassment watershed that has brought down Hollywood titans such as Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey has revived scrutiny of the allegations against Allen.

In the wake of the Time's Up movement now launched by powerful women in Hollywood, Allen's adopted daughter said it was time for the world to finally listen.

"Why shouldn't I want to bring him down? Why shouldn't I be angry? Why shouldn't I be hurt?" she told "CBS This Morning" in her first television interview, excerpts of which were broadcast on Wednesday.

"Why shouldn't I feel some sort of outrage that after all these years being ignored and disbelieved and tossed aside?" she added.

Asked why people should believe her now, she replied: "I suppose that's on them, but all I can do is speak my truth and hope that somebody will believe me instead of just hearing."

Actresses such as Greta Gerwig and Rebecca Hall have said recently they regret working with Allen. Hall, who stars in his upcoming movie "A Rainy Day in New York" said she had donated her wage from the film to the Time's Up movement.

Dylan Farrow detailed the alleged abuse for the first time in her own words in an open letter published on a New York Times blog in 2014.

In a 2014 New York Times op-ed, Allen repeated his denial and launched a furious attack on Mia Farrow, denouncing her as "more interested in her own festering anger than her daughter's well-being."

A New York judge who presided over the 1994 custody battle between Allen and Farrow ruled that the abuse allegations were inconclusive, but at the same time lambasted the director as "self-absorbed, untrustworthy and insensitive."

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