Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

BUSINESS DAILY

Alibaba founder rolls back on pledge to create 1m US jobs

Read more

IN THE PRESS

Controversial or creative? A chef gets lobsters high before boiling them so they don't suffer

Read more

THE DEBATE

Breakthrough in Pyongyang? Kim promises to visit Seoul, dismantle nuclear sites

Read more

MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Rapper I-NZ's 'This is Iraq': When music gets political

Read more

ENCORE!

Film show: 'The Sisters Brothers' and 'Leave No Trace'

Read more

IN THE PRESS

Stormy Daniels's X-rated book attacks Trump's presidency - and manhood

Read more

PERSPECTIVE

Polar explorer Sebastian Copeland on the 'urgency' of climate change awareness

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

US-China trade war deepens as Beijing calls for global support

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Amnesty warns of 'horrific' violence in Cameroon's anglophone regions

Read more

ACCESS ASIA

Exclusive reports, features and analysis on political and social events from across the Asian continent. Every Monday at 5.45 pm Paris time.

Latest update : 2018-01-22

Why Hong Kong produces 200,000 tons of electronic waste per year

Where do your computers, tablets and smartphones go to die? Electronic waste is an environmental problem throughout Asia, but nowhere more so than in Hong Kong. For a long time the city was only a stepping stone before the waste went to mainland China. But since 2015, the Chinese authorities have banned its import and containers remain docked. Clandestine landfills are now popping up in Hong Kong. Our correspondents Antoine Védéilhé, Vivien Wong and Sarah O'Meara report on the consequences.

Meanwhile, in central Pakistan, DNA tests have confirmed that the same person carried out the rapes and murders of six children in the city of Kasur. Concerns that a serial killer is on the loose have prompted soul-searching over whether the country fails to protect the most vulnerable. It was only in 2016 that Pakistan criminalised child abuse.

Over in China, a photograph of an eight-year-old boy with icicles in his hair made waves in the country and around the world, becoming a symbol of those impoverished and left behind by the country's economic boom. We tell you more about Fuman Wang, the Ice Boy of China.

Finally, South Korea is putting its money where its mouth is. After saying it wants to become the epicentre of winter sports in Asia, the country has invested $800 million on new facilities ahead of hosting the Winter Olympics. But judging from the country's own track record, some facilities run the risk of being neglected or abandoned in the future.

By William HILDERBRANDT , Stéphane BERNSTEIN , Anne POUZARGUES

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2018-09-18 Access Asia

Iwao Hakamada, the Japanese boxer still fighting... for his life

In Japan, 82-year-old Iwao Hakamada spent half a century on death row before being released. But the former professional boxer is still locked in a legal back and forth. Today he...

Read more

2018-09-06 Access Asia

Replacing plastic: China tries to clean up its act

As we get a clearer idea about just how dangerous plastic pollution is for the environment, the race is on to find ecological replacements for everyday plastic objects,...

Read more

2018-08-28 Access Asia

Korean families reunited after decades apart

As ties between the two Koreas improve, a group of elderly South Koreans have met long-lost family members in North Korea. This after being separated by the war that broke out 68...

Read more

2018-08-08 Access Asia

HIV rates on the rise among Chinese youth

China has seen an alarming spike in HIV cases, with the infection rate among those between the ages of 15 and 19 tripling over the past decade. The upturn comes as young people...

Read more

2018-07-27 Access Asia

Japan: Record-breaking heatwave takes a toll on population

Japan is dealing with record-breaking high temperatures as an intense heatwave sees over 9,000 people hospitalised with heatstroke. It's prompted concerns about how Tokyo will...

Read more