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An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2018-07-27

Video: Zimbabwe faces up to its painful past

After three decades of silence, people in Zimbabwe are finally speaking out about the brutal civil war that followed independence. It’s no longer taboo to mention the ethnic massacres of the 1980s - even though President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who ousted Robert Mugabe last year, was head of the security services at the time. As survivors tell their horrific stories, young people discover their parents' suffering. Reconciliation may depend on how Zimbabwe comes to terms with its painful past.

Our reporters have been talking to the survivors of one of Zimbabwe’s most violent periods, a time when former president Robert Mugabe's forces brutally attacked fellow citizens. Between 1983 and 1985, the army carried out numerous massacres in the western region of Matabeleland. At the heart of the matter was a catastrophic falling-out between Robert Mugabe and Joshua Nkomo, an erstwhile ally, before Mugabe became president in 1987.

Today the memory of that time is still all too vivid in the minds of survivors, and its legacy is ever-present in popular songs and even theatre. Meanwhile, bodies are finally being exhumed and examined so that families can find out what happened to their loved ones. FRANCE 24’s Caroline Dumay and Stefan Carstens report from Zimbabwe.

By Caroline DUMAY , Stefan CARSTENS

Archives

2018-09-21 Reporters

Colombia: Cursed by coca in Catatumbo

While the United Nations on Wednesday announced that Colombia remains the world’s largest cocaine producer, our reporters visited the northeastern region of Catatumbo - one of...

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2018-09-14 Reporters

Nigeria: the fight against Boko Haram

As Nigeria’s army continues its offensive against Boko Haram extremists, our reporters Catherine Norris-Trent and Jonathan Walsh travelled to the northeast of the country, still...

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2018-09-07 Reporters

Video: The North Korean gamble

As North Korea celebrates its 70th anniversary, FRANCE 24 brings you a unique report from inside the world’s most secretive nation. In an extremely rare move, the authorities in...

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2018-08-31 Reporters

Forced disappearances in Mexico's drug war

Since 2006, when the Mexican military began to intervene in the country's war on drug trafficking, tens of thousands of people have gone missing. Have they been killed, sold to...

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2018-08-03 Reporters

Video: Super Mama Djombo, Guinea-Bissau’s soundtrack

Today, if the small West African state of Guinea Bissau is famous—or, perhaps more correctly, infamous—for anything, it’s for frequent coups d’état. But that hasn’t always been...

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