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PERSPECTIVE

Every morning, FRANCE 24 speaks to a key business, social or cultural player, or a leading voice in the field of humanitarian action, sport or science. From Monday to Friday at 8.40 am Paris time.

Latest update : 2018-10-23

Down syndrome in France: 'People are ready for inclusion, institutions must catch up'

France is noted as a world leader when it comes to education, with 23% of the budget earmarked for it. But it was only in 2005 that France changed its laws to make access to education equal for everyone, including special needs students. Caroline Boudet is mother to a little girl with Down syndrome, Louise. She joined us for Perspective.

"Inclusion is not real in France; it is a word, it is in the law", Boudet tells FRANCE 24. In reality, she explains, parents are constantly confronted with difficulties and questioned over the decision to have a special needs child in mainstream education.

Specialist doctors say that anyone with Down syndrome is as capable as anyone else and that those with it benefit from being integrated into regular society. People with Down syndrome, however, do need extra help to learn and Louise has an assistant to help her for some of the time she is at school. Her parents had to fight very hard to obtain that help, which isn’t guaranteed going forward. "I still remain fearful [for the future] because in France, every year, the system will check if Louise can stay in mainstream education," her mother explains.

By Eve IRVINE

Archives

2018-11-15 Perspective

'Photography is part of our daily lives and we want to reflect that'

Tucked away in Paris's Marais neighbourhood is a little gem dedicated to photography. La Maison Européenne de la Photographie has been drawing in crowds since it first opened its...

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2018-11-14 Perspective

Men's health in 'Movember': Raising awareness of male wellbeing

"Check your equipment regularly". That's the message from a worldwide campaign, also followed here in France, to encourage men to do more to look after their bodies. "Movember"...

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2018-11-13 Perspective

Nov 13 Paris terror attacks: 'Islam is part of the solution'

On the third anniversary of the Paris attacks that killed 130 people, FRANCE 24 spoke to Asif Arif -- the co-author of a book about terrorist links between France and Belgium --...

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2018-11-12 Perspective

'Women are the great survivors'

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2018-11-09 Perspective

Ron Amir: Blurring the lines between art and activism

Since mid-September, a new exhibition has been drawing in crowds at Paris's Modern Art Museum. Titled "Somewhere in the Desert" in English, it’s a collection of 30 colour...

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