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Several dead in attack on bus carrying Coptic Christians in Egypt

© Mohamed El-Shahed, AFP | Egyptians attend mass at the St. Mark Coptic Orthodox Cathedral in the Bani Mazar province in May 2017.

Video by Sharif KOUDDOUS

Text by FRANCE 24

Latest update : 2018-11-03

Gunmen on Friday ambushed a bus carrying Christian pilgrims on their way to a remote desert monastery south of the Egyptian capital of Cairo, killing seven and wounding seven more, according to the Coptic Orthodox Church and the Interior Ministry.

All but one of those killed were members of the same family, according to a list of the victims' names released by the church.

The local Islamic State (IS) group affiliate which spearheads militants fighting security forces in the Sinai Peninsula claimed responsibility for the attack, according to the extremist group's Amaq news agency.

Though its claim could be not immediately verified, the IS group has repeatedly stated its intention to target Egypt's Christians as punishment for their support of President Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi. As defence minister, al-Sisi led the military's 2013 ouster of an Islamist president, whose one-year rule proved divisive. It has claimed responsibility for a string of deadly attacks on Christians dating back to December 2016.

Al-Sisi, who has made the economy and security his top priorities since taking office in 2014, wrote on his Twitter account that Friday's attack was designed to harm the "nation's solid fabric" and pledged to continue fighting terrorism. He later offered his condolences when he spoke by telephone with Pope Tawadros II, spiritual leader of Egypt's Orthodox Christians and a close al-Sisi ally.

The attack is likely to cast a dark shadow on one of al-Sisi's showpieces – the World Youth Forum – which opens Saturday in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh and hopes to draw thousands of local and foreign youth to discuss upcoming projects, with Egypt's 63-year-old leader taking centre stage.

Friday's attack is the second to target pilgrims heading to the St. Samuel the Confessor monastery in as many years, indicating that security measures in place since then are either inadequate or have become lax. The previous attack in May 2017 left nearly 30 people dead. It is also the latest by the IS group to target Christians in churches in Cairo, the Mediterranean city of Alexandria and Tanta in the Nile Delta north of the capital.

Those attacks left at least 100 people dead and led to tighter security around Christian places of worship and Church-linked facilities. They have also underlined the vulnerability of minority Christians in a country where many Muslims have since the 1970s grown religiously conservative.

The Interior Ministry, which oversees the police, said Friday's attackers used secondary dirt roads to reach the bus carrying the pilgrims, who were near the monastery at the time of the attack. Only pilgrims have been allowed on the main road leading to the monastery since last year's attack.

Egypt's Christians, who account for some 10 percent of the country's 100 million people, complain of discrimination in the Muslim majority country. Christian activists say the church's alliance with al-Sisi has offered the ancient community a measure of protection but failed to end frequent acts of discrimination that boil over into violence against Christians, especially in rural Egypt.

In Minya, the scene of Friday's attack, Christians constitute the highest percentage of the population – about 35 percent – of any Egyptian province. It's also in Minya where most acts of violence, like attacks on churches and Christian homes and businesses, take place.

Christians there often claim that the local police is soft on Muslims accused of attacking Christians and, in their pursuit of keeping the peace between the two communities, insist on resolving differences through tribal-like reconciliation meetings rather than rule of law.

Friday's attack comes at a time when the church is still reeling from the July killing inside another desert monastery of its abbot. Two monks, one of whom has been defrocked, are on trial for the killing of the abbot, Bishop Epiphanius.

(FRANCE 24 with AP)

Date created : 2018-11-02

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