Skip to main content

VIDEO: Risking her life to save others in Nazi-occupied Poland

Helena Troszczynska was just 12 years old when she risked her life to save her Jewish cousins from the Nazis.
Helena Troszczynska was just 12 years old when she risked her life to save her Jewish cousins from the Nazis. © FRANCE 24 screengrab

Helena Troszczynska was just a child when she and her family opened up their home to help two Jewish cousins flee Nazi persecution in 1943. At the time, the act carried the death penalty in Nazi-occupied Poland, but Troszczynska, who along with her mother were later registered as “Righteous Among the Nations”, says she has always lived by the principle of loving thy neighbour. FRANCE 24 reports.

Advertising

Troszczynska was just 12 years old when two Jewish cousins showed up at her family’s home in eastern Warsaw one evening in 1943. They had escaped from the ghetto in the city centre, where the Nazis were crushing the uprising, and were desperately seeking refuge.

Troszczynska’s parents had the keys to a house across the road that had burned down but whose basement remained intact and where the two men stayed until the liberation of Warsaw in 1944.

Troszczynska would often bring them food and other provisions and was later registered as Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem after one of her cousins nominated her for her bravery and solidarity.

“We knew what we were risking. But we were brought up with three principles: truth, work, and love thy neighbour. If someone's in need, you have to help them, whether it's a Jew or anyone else,” she says.

Click the player above to watch the full report.
 

Daily news briefReceive essential international news every morning

Page not found

The content you requested does not exist or is not available anymore.