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WEEK IN REVIEW

Week in Review: Parisians adapt to a life on lockdown and the race to find a coronavirus vaccine

Week in Review
Week in Review © Screen grabs FRANCE 24 and Ed Jones, AFP

As the coronavirus stole headlines across the world, we take a look at the race to find a vaccine that could put an end to the global pandemic and strolled through empty streets as a coronavirus quarantine was announced and Paris ground to a halt. On a lighter note, the French are bursting into applause on their balconies every night at 8pm to pay tribute to the country's overstretched health workers.

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ARTICLES

Coronavirus: where do we stand in the race for a vaccine?

As the world races to find a vaccine or a cure for the coronavirus, antimalarial drugs, HIV medications, flu vaccines and arthritis treatments are all being tested. FRANCE 24 takes a look at the latest medical efforts to combat the pandemic.

Vials displayed during a neutralising antibody test on the Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus at a laboratory at the International Vaccine Institute (IVI) in Seoul, March 11, 2020.
Vials displayed during a neutralising antibody test on the Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus at a laboratory at the International Vaccine Institute (IVI) in Seoul, March 11, 2020. AFP - ED JONES

Doors slam shut across borderless Europe as coronavirus spreads

Europe’s cherished Schengen network of open internal borders is on the brink of collapse as more and more countries shut their doors in a frantic effort to stave off the coronavirus pandemic, even as experts warn such tactics will delay its spread – but not halt it.

Escape and resignation as life slows in Paris

In the hours before French President Emmanuel Macron announced another round of restrictions in an effort to curb the coronavirus and less than two days after all “non-essential” commerce was ordered shut, life in Paris was palpably winding down.

A military patrol in Charles DeGaulle airport passes in front of closed concessions on March 16, 2020.
A military patrol in Charles DeGaulle airport passes in front of closed concessions on March 16, 2020. © Monique El-Faizy

Coronavirus emergency spending 'is two years of climate financing’, says climatologist Jean Jouzel

French climatologist Jean Jouzel says the swift global reaction to the coronavirus crisis may bode well for the climate as well: It shows that in a real emergency, nations have the means – and the will – to act. "It is just as urgent to tackle the climate problem," he says.

French climatologist Jean Jouzel arrives for a meeting on March 18, 2019, at the Élysée Palace in Paris.
French climatologist Jean Jouzel arrives for a meeting on March 18, 2019, at the Élysée Palace in Paris. © Ludovic Marin, AFP

IN PICTURES

In pictures: France grinds to a halt as cafés and all 'non-essential' business ordered to close

Many normally bustling areas appeared deserted on Sunday after French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe ordered the closure of restaurants, cafés and all other "non-essential" commerce beginning at midnight on Saturday. Groceries, pharmacies, tobacconists and petrol stations will remain open.

A shop in Paris carries the sign, "Sorry, we are closed."
A shop in Paris carries the sign, "Sorry, we are closed." © Philippe Lopez, AFP

VIDEO REPORTS

‘Papers, please’: France adapts to life on coronavirus lockdown

The streets have been nearly empty in cities across France after the country went into lockdown at noon on Tuesday to combat the spread of coronavirus, with police out in force to ensure the new rules are being respected. For residents, the new measures mean adapting to a new way of life.

Only the police are visiting the Eiffel Tower during lockdown in Paris, March 18 2020.
Only the police are visiting the Eiffel Tower during lockdown in Paris, March 18 2020. © FRANCE 24 screengrab.

Coronavirus: A walk through a deserted Paris

With France in coronavirus lockdown, Paris has become almost deserted, with only a few joggers, pedestrians and vehicles remaining on the streets, a far cry from the crowds and traffic that normally fill the French capital.

An empty Paris during lockdown, March 19 2020.
An empty Paris during lockdown, March 19 2020. © FRANCE 24 screengrab.

#WeApplaud: French pay tribute to health workers from their balconies

On Tuesday evening, people across France gathered at their balconies and windows to clap for the country’s health workers battling the coronavirus pandemic as the country went into lockdown.

TV SHOWS ONLINE

THE INTERVIEW

Ehud Olmert tells FRANCE 24: 'Benjamin Netanyahu has to go home'

In a wide-ranging interview in Tel Aviv, former Israeli prime minister Ehud Olmert discussed the country's ongoing formation of a government and openly criticised his successor and rival Benjamin Netanyahu who, he says, is "not capable of continuing". He also addressed the issue of Iran, which regularly threatens Israel.

Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert speaks with FRANCE 24, March 18 2020.
Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert speaks with FRANCE 24, March 18 2020. © FRANCE 24

PEOPLE & PROFIT

Scarf-maker Scough among companies benefiting from the coronavirus outbreak

As the coronavirus pandemic spreads, some companies are benefiting from the outbreak. Andrew Kessler, the founder of Scough – which makes scarves with built-in air filters – says his firm is struggling to satisfy demand. But first, the head of Germany's influential Ifo research institute has warned that Europe's biggest economy could fall into recession. And we take a look at a gold mine in Australia that's run into a bat problem.

The creator of the Scough, Andrew Kessler, speaks with FRANCE 24, March 12 2020.
The creator of the Scough, Andrew Kessler, speaks with FRANCE 24, March 12 2020. © FRANCE 24 screengrab.

TECH24

Dystopia vs reality: the sci-fi films helping us gain a critical outlook on society

As COVID-19 spreads throughout the world, we take a look at the sci-fi movies and dystopian novels that may have predicted such an outbreak. In this edition, we also explore the influence and the critical outlook that TV series can have on science and innovation, but also politics and society at large.

DOWN TO EARTH

Cigarette butts: the world's most littered item

With just a flick of a finger, trillions of cigarette butts are discarded into the environment every year. But how exactly do they pollute and at what rate?

The world's most littered item in the world is cigarette butts, March 6 2020.
The world's most littered item in the world is cigarette butts, March 6 2020. © FRANCE 24 screengrab.

PERSPECTIVE

Life lessons with Noha Baz: Paediatrician, foodie and tireless optimist

Noha Baz's recently published autobiography is a hymn to the complex contradictions of modern-day Lebanon. An experienced paediatrician and passionate food writer, Baz has spent her adult life fighting for a fairer start for Lebanon's most marginalised children while always reminding us of life's simplest pleasures.  

FOCUS

Coronavirus in Italy: From Florence to Palermo, tourism and economy grind to a halt

As Italy reels from the coronavirus pandemic, the entire country is under quarantine. From the Tuscan city of Florence to the Sicilian capital Palermo to the large port of Genoa, our correspondents measured the catastrophic impact of the virus on tourism and the Italian economy. Their report was filmed just before further restrictive measures came into force, closing all stores except for pharmacies and food shops.

Deserted Florence without any tourists, Italy, March 12 2020.
Deserted Florence without any tourists, Italy, March 12 2020. © FRANCE 24 screengrab.

ENCORE

Christian Louboutin: Speaking to the 'sole' man at his Paris exhibition

One of the world's best-known shoe designers speaks to FRANCE 24 about his famous red-soled shoes, why the Palais de la Porte Dorée museum inspired him and who is the one person he'd like to see wearing his creations.

Christian Louboutin talks shoes and art with FRANCE 24's Encore programme, March 19 2020.
Christian Louboutin talks shoes and art with FRANCE 24's Encore programme, March 19 2020. © FRANCE 24 screengrab.

Author Angie Thomas on her follow-up to phenomenon 'The Hate U Give'

Angie Thomas's debut book, "The Hate U Give", talked about some of the most sensitive and contentious subjects in America today: race, privilege and the killings of unarmed black people at the hands of the police. It spent more than a hundred weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and was made into a movie. Thomas speaks to FRANCE 24 about writing a blockbuster new young-adult book, "On the Come Up", which has been translated into French, and why she wanted to talk about hip-hop as an art form.

Author Angie Thomas speaks to Encore's Eve Jackson about how hip-hop is an art form, March 17 2020.
Author Angie Thomas speaks to Encore's Eve Jackson about how hip-hop is an art form, March 17 2020. © FRANCE 24 screengrab.

Personal possessions, onerous ownership & haunted homes: Lionel Shriver explores 'Property'

Lionel Shriver's new collection of short fiction explores just what it is about owning material things that affects a person's thoughts and actions. Shriver's anthology, "Property", looks at the material wealth of late-stage capitalism and reflects upon what it means for its proprietors. The award-winning author of "We Need to Talk About Kevin" also talks to FRANCE 24 about the power of weakness and the generation gap between Baby Boomers and Millennials in her new book.

EYE ON AFRICA

Coronavirus: WHO tells African countries to 'prepare for the worst'

The head of the World Health Organization has sounded the alarm over Africa's preparedness for the coronavirus pandemic, telling the continent to "prepare for the worst". The number of cases in South Africa has nearly doubled and Burkina Faso has recorded the first Sub-Saharan fatality due to the virus. 

Healthworkers spray the inside of buses in South Africa, March 18 2020.
Healthworkers spray the inside of buses in South Africa, March 18 2020. © FRANCE 24 screengrab.

YOU ARE HERE

A sparkling past and future: France's Vosges region, the home of crystal

Five centuries ago, a special type of glassware was born in the northern valleys of France's Vosges region. The production of crystal once employed 5,000 people in these hills. The Lalique factory, near the border with Alsace, is one of the world's best. Further west, another French town symbolises crystal excellence: Baccarat and its 250-year-old factory.

You Are Here
You Are Here © France 24

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