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WEEK IN REVIEW

Week in Review: French cities under a Covid curfew, reports on the US election and ‘Emily in Paris’ sparks debate

Week in Review
Week in Review © France 24 illustration
8 min

Paris and other French cities prepared for a 9pm coronavirus curfew as French authorities announced a nationwide ban on weddings and other large events – a reality far from the romanticism of Darren Star’s new show “Emily in Paris”, which has prompted debate about French clichés and idealised American notions of the French capital.

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ARTICLES

Health workers in France go on strike as coronavirus cases surge

Several hundred health workers took to the streets of Paris on Thursday afternoon to protest against conditions in French hospitals as the number of new coronavirus cases has surged across the country.

Health workers protest on the Place Vauban in Paris on October 15, 2020.
Health workers protest on the Place Vauban in Paris on October 15, 2020. © Alain Jocard, AFP

Does Trickbot and its million zombie computers pose a threat to the US election?

Tech giant Microsoft and the United States military intelligence are taking on Trickbot, deeming the botnet – one of the world's largest networks of computers controlled remotely by cybercriminals – a potential threat to the US presidential election.

Darren Star gives Paris the ‘Sex and the City’ treatment with new show, ‘Emily in Paris’

When "Sex and the City" came out in 1998, perhaps no one loved the show more than the New Yorkers the series portrayed. Now its creator has turned his sights to Paris, and the French capital is abuzz. 

"Emily in Paris" shows a sanitized view of Paris.
"Emily in Paris" shows a sanitized view of Paris. © Thomas Samson, AFP

Private festivities, weddings banned during during France’s Covid-19 state of emergency

After French President Emmanuel Macron announced a nighttime curfew in Paris and eight other cities, the government detailed tough new measures to curb the spread of Covid-19, including a nationwide ban on private festivities such as weddings.

French authorities search home of health minister, ex-PM in inquiry into handling of Covid-19

French police searched the homes of Health Minister Olivier Véran, former prime minister Edouard Philippe and other officials as part of an inquiry into the government's handling of the coronavirus crisis.

France imposes curfew in Paris and other cities as Europe ramps up Covid-19 restrictions

France is the latest European country to toughen anti-coronavirus measures, imposing a curfew in Paris and eight other cities set to begin on Saturday, while Germany and Ireland also ramped up restrictions.

Cyclists ride past the Au Chat Noir bar, which was closed as part of stricter restrictions due to the spread of Covid-19, in Paris, France on October 13, 2020.
Cyclists ride past the Au Chat Noir bar, which was closed as part of stricter restrictions due to the spread of Covid-19, in Paris, France on October 13, 2020. © Charles Platiau, Reuters

Policing without consent: Why French police are ill-equipped to ‘reconquer’ Paris suburbs

Brazen attacks on French police have highlighted the divide between law enforcement and youths in France’s most deprived suburbs. Analysts say bridging the chasm requires changing the entrenched culture of a police force that is answerable to the state, not the people.

Sarkozy under formal investigation for ‘criminal association’ in Libyan funding scandal

French prosecutors placed former president Nicolas Sarkozy under formal investigation for "criminal association" related to allegations that he accepted campaign funding from former Libyan strongman Muammar Gaddafi.

Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy answers journalist's questions during a signing session of his new book "Le Temps des Tempêtes" inside Baleone shopping center in Ajaccio, on July 24, 2020, on the French Mediterranean island of Corsica.
Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy answers journalist's questions during a signing session of his new book "Le Temps des Tempêtes" inside Baleone shopping center in Ajaccio, on July 24, 2020, on the French Mediterranean island of Corsica. © Pascal Pochard-Casabianca, AFP

REPORTS ON THE US ELECTION

From the streets to the ballot box, America’s youngest voters are ready to be heard

In key battleground states, Gen Z is ready to make its voice heard. And for many among America’s most progressive generation, that means setting aside their misgivings about establishment politics to vote for the Democratic candidate, Joe Biden.

At the Cleveland Presidential Debate Protest for Black Lives and Climate Justice, September 29, 2020.
At the Cleveland Presidential Debate Protest for Black Lives and Climate Justice, September 29, 2020. © Colin Kinniburgh

In Dearborn, Michigan, Muslim Americans are mobilising to defeat Trump

In Dearborn, a suburb of Detroit where a third of residents identify as Arab-American or are of Arab descent, Muslim voters lean decidedly towards the Democrats. And while Joe Biden wasn’t the first choice for many here, widespread opposition to President Donald Trump is bringing voters into his camp. 

‘We are in serious trouble’: A close presidential race puts Michigan on edge

Donald Trump’s upset victory in Michigan in 2016 was key to his winning the White House. This year, Joe Biden is counting on bringing the state back into the Democratic fold. Travelling across the Midwestern battleground, FRANCE 24 met voters on both sides who are bracing for catastrophe if their candidate loses the election.

In Pennsylvania, fracking might not be the winning issue US presidential candidates think it is

In the battle for the White House, Pennsylvania and fracking have become all but synonymous. Yet in one of the state’s largest gas-producing counties, FRANCE 24 found residents’ relationship with the industry to be far more vexed than the national debate suggests.

Lois Bower-Bjornson, southwestern Pennsylvania field organizer with Clean Air Council, points out a fracking well site just over the hill from her home in Scenery Hill, Pennsylvania.
Lois Bower-Bjornson, southwestern Pennsylvania field organizer with Clean Air Council, points out a fracking well site just over the hill from her home in Scenery Hill, Pennsylvania. © Colin Kinniburgh

TV PROGRAMMES

THE INTERVIEW

Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev: ‘We never deliberately attacked civilians’

Aliyev spoke to FRANCE 24 from the country's capital of Baku while the conflict between Armenian and Azerbaijani forces over the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh continued to escalate. The president denied any deliberate attack on civilians from Azerbaijan’s side and described reports of Turkish military involvement on his country's behalf as “fake news”.

THE INTERVIEW
THE INTERVIEW © FRANCE 24

MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Islamic State group on trial: mother of murdered reporter James Foley speaks out

American journalist James Foley was one of the first Western hostages to be killed by the Islamic State group. After a six-year-long wait, two of his alleged killers are facing trial in the US. Both men have pleaded not guilty to torture and murder. We speak to James's mother, Diane Foley, days ahead of what would have been her son’s 47th birthday.

YOU ARE HERE

The talented craftsmen who work for the French army

The craftsmen who shape the accessories of France's Republican Guard cannot be replaced by machines. Their best talent builds new musical instruments, be they helicons or clarinets, for the Guard’s cavalry band. And the craftsmen of the Paris Mint create the Military Medal, one of France’s highest honours. FRANCE 24 takes a close look at these unique artisans.

ENCORE!

‘Uprooted’: The film that reclaims the true history of jazz dance

When we think of jazz dance, we may think of Broadway, the West End, Liza Minelli or West Side Story. The illuminating film “Uprooted” takes us much further back to the roots of this dance of African descent, born out of slavery and entangled with the African American experience through hip hop and beyond.

ENCORE!
ENCORE! © France 24

Film show: Iranian reality TV that decides if you live or die

We take a look at “Yalda: A Night for Forgiveness”, a prize-winning Iranian drama inspired by a reality TV show, and “The Trial of the Chicago 7”, screenwriter Aaron Sorkin’s second directorial turn after 2017’s “Molly's Game” with Jessica Chastain. 

FASHION

Ready-to-wear, summer 2021: Catwalk shows return to Paris Fashion Week

As the fashion world mourned the death of designer Kenzo Takada, Paris once again played host to real-life catwalk shows. Under the leadership of creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista, Kenzo sounded the alarm over the destruction of global bee populations. Nigerian designer Kenneth Ize used his show to celebrate his queer identity, and at Dior, Maria Grazia Chiuri explored the way clothes exist in the private sphere.

Kenneth Ize, styliste nigérian.
Kenneth Ize, styliste nigérian. © Pascal Mourier

PEOPLE & PROFIT

‘2020 has felt like an apocalyptic year for many US startups’: When politics hit expasion plans

American startups looking to expand globally are facing challenges from the coronavirus pandemic to Brexit. We spoke to tech executive-turned-investor Stephen McIntyre about the decisions they’re making. We also looked at the growing debt mountain facing developing countries, and, from Australia, our correspondents reported that a shortage of sheep shearers is causing headaches in that country's multibillion-dollar wool industry.

 

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