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In pictures: Payday comes and goes, again, as US shutdown endures

A federal employee wears an evocative headband at a rally on Capitol Hill in Washington for a vote on the shutdown, on January 23, 2019.
A federal employee wears an evocative headband at a rally on Capitol Hill in Washington for a vote on the shutdown, on January 23, 2019. Jim Watson, AFP

Entering its 35th day on Friday, the longest-ever US shutdown reached another grim milestone: Hundreds of thousands of federal workers missed a second paycheck. Amid such uncertainty, many are up against the wall, so to speak. A look, in pictures.

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A sign at the entrance of the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, DC, closed due to the government shutdown, on January 11, 2019.
On Thursday, two bills aimed at ending the six-week-old crisis – one that included funding for President Donald Trump’s contentious $5.7 billion US-Mexico border wall and another Democrat-backed measure that did not – failed in the Senate, sending lawmakers back to the drawing board.
A sign at the entrance of the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, DC, closed due to the government shutdown, on January 11, 2019. On Thursday, two bills aimed at ending the six-week-old crisis – one that included funding for President Donald Trump’s contentious $5.7 billion US-Mexico border wall and another Democrat-backed measure that did not – failed in the Senate, sending lawmakers back to the drawing board. Saul Loeb, AFP

Olivia Anderson of Arlington, VA, joins volunteers, many of whom are furloughed workers, to clean up trash on the National Mall in response to the partial government shutdown in Washington, DC, on January 4, 2019.
The current shutdown has not affected three-quarters of the US government, including Defence and the Postal Service, which benefit from secure funding. But 800,000 federal employees have been furloughed or are working without pay. The departments of Homeland Security, Transportation and Interior, which includes the National Park Service, are among those affected, as well as agencies including the Internal Revenue Service, the Environmental Protection Agency and NASA.
Olivia Anderson of Arlington, VA, joins volunteers, many of whom are furloughed workers, to clean up trash on the National Mall in response to the partial government shutdown in Washington, DC, on January 4, 2019. The current shutdown has not affected three-quarters of the US government, including Defence and the Postal Service, which benefit from secure funding. But 800,000 federal employees have been furloughed or are working without pay. The departments of Homeland Security, Transportation and Interior, which includes the National Park Service, are among those affected, as well as agencies including the Internal Revenue Service, the Environmental Protection Agency and NASA. Kevin Lamarque, Reuters

US Secret Service Uniformed Division officers, working without pay during the shutdown, in front of White House on January 19, 2019.
With 245,000 people on staff, the Department of Homeland Security oversees Customs and Border Protection, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), the Coast Guard and the Secret Service. Nearly 213,000 DHS employees have been deemed “essential” and are working without pay.
US Secret Service Uniformed Division officers, working without pay during the shutdown, in front of White House on January 19, 2019. With 245,000 people on staff, the Department of Homeland Security oversees Customs and Border Protection, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), the Coast Guard and the Secret Service. Nearly 213,000 DHS employees have been deemed “essential” and are working without pay. Yuri Gripas, Reuters

Three-year-old Greta Croteau, the daughter of a Coast Guard member working without pay, helps her mother pick up items distributed by Gather food pantry at the US Coast Guard Portsmouth Harbor base in New Castle, New Hampshire, on January 23, 2019.
Coast Guard Admiral Commandant Karl Schultz on Twitter this week called it “unacceptable that Coast Guard men and women have to rely on food pantries and donations to get through day-to-day life as servicemembers” working without pay. "Our #USCG members sail across the world to protect US national interests while their loved ones cope w/ financial challenges & no pay at home," Schultz tweeted.
Three-year-old Greta Croteau, the daughter of a Coast Guard member working without pay, helps her mother pick up items distributed by Gather food pantry at the US Coast Guard Portsmouth Harbor base in New Castle, New Hampshire, on January 23, 2019. Coast Guard Admiral Commandant Karl Schultz on Twitter this week called it “unacceptable that Coast Guard men and women have to rely on food pantries and donations to get through day-to-day life as servicemembers” working without pay. "Our #USCG members sail across the world to protect US national interests while their loved ones cope w/ financial challenges & no pay at home," Schultz tweeted. Brian Snyder, Reuters

Federal workers left unpaid or furloughed by the extended partial government shutdown stand in line for fresh food and coffee at the World Central Kitchen, a volunteer emergency kitchen run by Chef Jose Andres, in Washington, DC, on January 16, 2019.
Hotels, bars and restaurants have stepped in to offer rooms, meals and snacks, free or at a discount, to shutdown-affected workers. Food banks, too, have opened their doors as the stalemate continues.
Federal workers left unpaid or furloughed by the extended partial government shutdown stand in line for fresh food and coffee at the World Central Kitchen, a volunteer emergency kitchen run by Chef Jose Andres, in Washington, DC, on January 16, 2019. Hotels, bars and restaurants have stepped in to offer rooms, meals and snacks, free or at a discount, to shutdown-affected workers. Food banks, too, have opened their doors as the stalemate continues. Jonathan Ernst, Reuters

A Transportation Security Administration (TSA) employee receives a donation at a food distribution centre for federal workers impacted by the shutdown, at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, on January 22, 2019.
More than 50,000 TSA officers are working without pay. The agency said on Monday that unscheduled absences among US airport security officers rose to a record 10 percent on Sunday.
A Transportation Security Administration (TSA) employee receives a donation at a food distribution centre for federal workers impacted by the shutdown, at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, on January 22, 2019. More than 50,000 TSA officers are working without pay. The agency said on Monday that unscheduled absences among US airport security officers rose to a record 10 percent on Sunday. Brendan McDermid, Reuters

Preston Kirkpatrick, son of an Internal Revenue Service employee, holds a sign at a rally in Ogden, Utah, on January 10, 2019.
Nearly 70,000 IRS employees, or about 88 percent of its agency’s workforce, have been furloughed during the shutdown. The agency said it would recall about 46,000 employees to aid with tax season ahead of the April 15 US income tax filing deadline.
Preston Kirkpatrick, son of an Internal Revenue Service employee, holds a sign at a rally in Ogden, Utah, on January 10, 2019. Nearly 70,000 IRS employees, or about 88 percent of its agency’s workforce, have been furloughed during the shutdown. The agency said it would recall about 46,000 employees to aid with tax season ahead of the April 15 US income tax filing deadline. George Frey, Reuters

Faye Smith, a furloughed Smithsonian contract worker not paid during the shutdown, holds an unpaid electric bill to present to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office on Capitol Hill on January 16, 2019.
More than a million contractors have been affected by the shutdown – and, in contrast to federal employees, they are unlikely to receive backpay when business as usual finally resumes.
Faye Smith, a furloughed Smithsonian contract worker not paid during the shutdown, holds an unpaid electric bill to present to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office on Capitol Hill on January 16, 2019. More than a million contractors have been affected by the shutdown – and, in contrast to federal employees, they are unlikely to receive backpay when business as usual finally resumes. Saul Loeb, AFP

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